Circuits – Non-UK/America/Specific

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This topic contains 42 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Martin 1 week ago.

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  • #4241

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Pictured at the Norisring in 1974 is the German Team Firestone 911 RSR (#9114609095) of Richard Leder, who came 12th in this 7th round of the DRM series. The car was raced extensively by Leder during 1974 and 1975 and after a change of ownership for 1976 it changed hands again in 1977 and spent the rest of its career competing in Portugal.

    Here is another view of the same car at the same event, the the Nuremberg 200 Miles, where it finished a non-running 19th. The scene is rather more idyllic that that found at most circuits and this public road-based track was first used in 1947. It is centred around the remains of the site where the 1933-38 Nuremburg rallies (of a non-automotive kind!) took place and shows that even places with the most unfortunate associations can be given new and worthwhile uses.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4310

    Martin
    Keymaster

    ^As we can see from this interesting view taken at the 1977 Mugello Six Hours, inside every 935/77 is a 911 trying to get out! Although Mass/Barth put the car (#004) on pole it crashed during the race due to brake failure. The latest twin turbo installation can be seen from this angle.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 10 months, 3 weeks ago by  Martin.
  • #4313

    Martin
    Keymaster

    ^There must have been good money in selling rivets, as the Gesipa team ran a number of Porsche racing cars out of their profits! The German company was established in 1955 to develop blind rivet technology and also has a branch in West Yorkshire which was established in 1971.

    Anyway, enough of this riveting information, you want to know about the car and driver and it’s Dieter Frohlich in their 908/2 (#unestablished), smartly turned out in the distinctive blue and yellow livery that was usual for this team. The car started and finished 3rd at Zandvoort that day in 1969 competing in the 40 lap Trophy of the Dunes, which was won by another 908 and there was also a 906 in the top five, so a good Porsche result all round.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 10 months, 3 weeks ago by  Martin.
  • #4996

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This 956 (#109) spent four years racing for the Obermaier team and over that time wore a number of different colour schemes as sponsors came and went. Seen here at the 1985 Monza 1000Km with advertising covering almost every available part of its body, it was driven by Lassig/Regout/Pareja from a grid 12th, although their race ended with an engine problem at half distance. Note the addition of a nose wing, something tried by a number of private teams racing these cars but something that the factory said was pointless and which they never used.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5015

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Gurney leads Bonnier in their new 804’s during the 1962 Dutch Grand Prix, but the day was not a great one for the factory team. After qualifying 8th and 13th respectively Gurney (#02) suffered a gear linkage failure and retired at just over half distance and while Bonnier (#01) managed 7th -some 5 laps down on winner Hill in his BRM- it was privateer de Beaufort who was the first Porsche finisher in 6th (after qualifying 14th) using his old 718 (#01), an inspired performance in his home GP.

    The event marked the debut of the 804 and the cars were only allowed to race after having established practice times that Porsche felt to be acceptable. Although the Porsches were an obvious step forward over their previous contender the opposition had not been idle either and this was reflected in the result. As this was the opening World Championship round of the season it meant that de Beaufort found himself -perhaps rather unexpectedly- on the drivers points table and his position also contributed a constructors championship point for Porsche where the works cars had been unable to do so.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5018

    Martin
    Keymaster

    With the driver looking a bit tired at this point, the 356 1300 Super of Max Nathan/Hermut Glockler is seen during the 1954 Mille Miglia. They were the third 356 home and so secured 3rd in class as well as 34th overall, a very commendable result after just over 14 hours of racing on public roads!

    Only 182 cars survived this severe test of man and machine out of the 378 that started, the last car home -a Fiat- taking 28 hours to complete the course, slightly longer than the Isetta bubble car ahead of it.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5070

    Martin
    Keymaster

    There must be something very interesting happening on the other side of that fence as everyone is ignoring a Ferrari 512 (6th) and the 1st (No.2, #013/034) and 2nd (No.1, #017/004) place 917’s at the Monza 1000Km in 1971.  As can be seen from their chassis number changes both of these 917s were rebuilt, No.2 due to the crash that seriously injured David Piper while filming Le Mans and No.1 after an accident in the Brands Hatch 1000Km the previous year.

    As we are dealing with 917s it almost goes without saying that the replacement units were renumbered with the serials of those that they were replacing and so when both of the original chassis were subsequently repaired and sold (even after #013 had been recorded as ‘scrapped’) the reverse had to take place. Incidentally, Mark Finburgh bought car No.2 from the works in 1974 and still has it.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5071

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Without the slightest information about this car or its location we can only admire this late 1950s 356A Carrera as it speeds around a circuit many years ago. Perhaps someone knows something more?

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5079

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Another atmospheric practice shot from the Mugello Six Hours of 1977, showing the pole-setting 935/77 (#004) of Mass/Barth as seen in post#4310. Although this car was unfortunately eliminated by an accident caused by brake failure its team-mate went on to win.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5083

    Martin
    Keymaster

    At an unknown location during the 1955 Mille Miglia, this is the 356 1300 Super of Busch/Merkel. The car finished 64th out of the 279 survivors (255 cars having retired), taking almost four hours longer than the winning Mercedes and coming 7th in class. A race time of just under 14 hours over circa 1000 miles still gives a pretty impressive average speed though.

    Photo: Ted WalkerArchive

  • #5096

    Martin
    Keymaster

    ^This 906 -one of four entered by Italian teams- appears to be on lap 17 of the 1967 Monza 1000KM. Although the photographer has subjugated the car to its surroundings, it is a good illustration of the fearsome banking and the provision made to prevent anyone going over the top of it, something that was always rather lacking at Brooklands. By the time of this photo competitors were prevented from entering this section at too high a speed by a chicane and the banking was last used in 1969. Although now gently decaying it has so far escaped demolition, although this has been proposed.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5097

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Racing to a 2nd place on the Mugello road course in 1968 is the 910 (probably #027) of the Hart Ski team driven by the Swiss pairing of Siffert/Steinemann. The car carries the unusual and slightly crude rear wheelarch extensions which it acquired that year.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5099

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A less usual view of Dan Gurney in the 804 (#01) on his way to that historic first Porsche F1 victory in the 1962 French GP at Rouen. Even from this angle the car looks great and it was a certainly step forward for Porsche single-seaters, although no further victories for the two car team were forthcoming in the other championship rounds that year.

    The GP project was axed at the end of the season, almost certainly the correct decision for a number of reasons and it has to be said that subsequent attempts by Porsche to break into open wheel motorsport have also been unsuccessful. We can only look towards their entry into Formula E with the hope that this will prove to be much more fruitful.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5140

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This apparently standard 911 of Moretti/’Nomex’(!) is shown taking a tight line at the Mugello Grand Prix, a 1968 road race for sports-racing and touring cars. The car looks to be pretty much unmodified and without even a roll bar, the front lid quick release catch and the rudimentary taping of the headlamps the only concessions to competition work.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5149

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The 1967 Monza 1000Km saw a win for Ferrari on home ground and this works 910 (#008) in the hands of Rindt/Mitter had to settle for 3rd from a grid 10th, although it did win its class. In the background can be seen the damaged Scuderia Saggitario 904 of Barbuscia/Micangeli that started near the bottom of the grid in 38th position and later crashed.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5186

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A pair of 906’s are seen at the 1966 Spa 1000Km, one sporting the front winglets sometimes seen on these cars and the other without. The white factory entry (#124) of Koch/Schütz failed to finish due to an engine problem after qualifying 11th, while the Racing Team Holland example (#134) in the hands of Gijs & David van Lennep came home 15th from  a grid 13th.

    Although Gijs van Lennep is well known as a Porsche driver who twice won Le Mans for the company, his lesser known brother David also had a racing career during the 1960s. The other van Lennep brother Hugo raced briefly at this time and their cousin Gerard van Lennep was also very active on the circuits and in rallying before becoming successful in the media. Gerard was a great friend of Carel de Beaufort and like the de Beauforts the van Lenneps are members of the Dutch nobility.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5200

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This shot is ‘date and location unknown’ at present, although I hope that someone might be able to enlighten us.

    This Austrian-registered 1956/7 356A Speedster looks as though it is about to be overtaken by the faster 550 behind. The 356 looks to be in as-new condition and the club badges and bonnet straps point to a competition-minded enthusiast owner, just the sort of person at whom the car was aimed.

  • #5237

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The 22nd Mille Miglia took place in 1955 and this is the class-winning 550 Spyder of Siedel/Glockler. The car came an incredible 8th overall (out of 279 finishers and 534 starters!) and clocked a race time of 12h 8m 17s. It  was only beaten by more powerful cars from Ferrari, Maserati and Mercedes, one of the latter being the famous Moss/Jenkinson 300SLR that finished 1st in 10h 7m 48s. The registration plate looks to have had a much harder life than the car (evidence that it had been on a number of different cars, perhaps?) and you have to admire the man or men who painted the numbers on all those entries so neatly.

    Wolfgang Siedel raced sporadically in F1 from 1953-62 but was more successful as a sports car driver. He piloted Porsches on a number of occasions, winning the Targa Florio in a 718RSK in 1959. Walter Glockler is of course a very famous name in Porsche history, having started competing with Porsche-based cars of his own design as early as 1950. The Glockler company was one of the first Volkswagen dealers and the name still lives on in the Frankfurt  Porsche centre today.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5262

    Martin
    Keymaster

    At one time Porsche held an annual press day at Hockenheim to review their previous season and to drum up interest in their forthcoming motorsport year. These pictures were taken at the 1969 event and show some of the cars assembled for the journalists.

    On a damp and dismal (and no doubt cold) December we see a fine line-up of 908/2, 917 spyder and 917 coupe models. The 908 (likely #001) looks to be the Porsche Salzberg car that had recently won at Neubiberg in the hands of Rudi Lins and the 917 coupe (#unknown), although likely to be one of the initial 25, is in the latest short-tail form. The 917 spyder (#027) had been built as a test car in parallel to the one that Siffert had used in the 1969 Can-Am series and was never raced. Fitted with a 4.9L engine here, in 1971 it received a prototype 16 cylinder unit and still exists in this form in the Porsche collection.


    The 917 shown at the end of the line in the preceding picture receives some attention prior to giving the press ‘something to write home about’ in the hands of some factory racing drivers.

    Two mechanics (as they were then still called, rather than technicians) attend to the 917, one of them smoking while using an air-operated jack that must have been pretty much state-of-the-art in pit equipment at that time. Neatly turned out in their dark red overalls with Porsche and Shell badges and their lightweight footwear (although I don’t think that the hat was official team gear!), behind can be seen the two works Mercedes transporters, at least one of which passed to JWA when they took on the running of the factory team of 917’s. These would also still have been in the traditional and very smart dark red livery.

    This 914-6 GT was also present, one of the first examples of this variant. Aside from the front and rear lids being in fibreglass (reinforced with balsa wood!) and having quick release catches, note the hole for the fuel filler in the front cover, the neat additional lamps and the mildly flared front and rear wheel arches.

    This competition/fast road version is rarely pictured, the bubble-arched race and rally cars that were converted by the factory or by owners using factory-supplied parts being the examples usually portrayed.  The rear wheels seem to fill out the flared arches nicely while those at the front look a little lost within the extra space, but like many of these cars this one probably did not remain in standard trim for long.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5286

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The fact that there were effectively two works 917 teams racing against one another in 1970 -even if the idea might have been to double the chances of success- still seems a bit odd, so here at Zeltweg that October we see Slough v Salzburg and for that matter Gulf v Shell. Although the Austrian team (#023) were on their home ground, their drivers Elford/Attwood had to give best with their 4th place to winners Siffert/Redman in the JW car (#036/031).

    There looks to be little difference between the two 917’s apart from the tail wing and Attwood had driven the red car to the historic first overall Porsche Le Mans victory only a month before. That did not stop it continuing to race and after outings with the Martini team the following year it was ultimately sold.

    In the same race one Niki Lauda was also behind the wheel of a Porsche, a 908/2 in which he came 6th. This was his regular drive that year for the Bosch Racing Team Vienna, before he joined March in F1 for the 1971 season.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5291

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Seen at the Norisring in 1987 in an unraced livery publicising the PDK transmission -although different to the one used at the beginning of the year and mentioned below- this unusual view of a works 962C (#007) allows us to not only appreciate its proportions but to see its various air inlets and outlets.

    The car bears the name of Hans Stuck, who is standing behind it, but at this ADAC Supercup meeting this was only a T-car and the 962 (#009) that he raced can just be seen in the garage. That one is finished in the usual factory red/yellow Shell and Dunlop livery of that period -although it too had previously worn a special PDK scheme- and after setting pole it came 3rd.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5308

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This looks to be Monza and given what is going on it would have to be practice for the 1970 1000Km race. The 917 (#009) receiving all the attention from the ever-dirty JW pit crew (was orange the ideal overall colour?) qualified 1st in the hands of Siffert/Redman but they could only manage 12th in the race due to the former damaging the car on lap 11 in a spin caused by a backmarker crossing his line. The repairs took 16 laps to accomplish and they were still 12 in arrears at the end.


    The Ferrari 512S also in the picture belonged Georg Loos (who died in 2016 at 73), whose red and yellow GELO team Porsches were to become a familiar sight racing internationally, although on this occasion his car failed to qualify. Loos had started racing Porsches in 1968 and after also running Ferraris and McLarens between 1970 and 1973 concentrated on Porsces as a driver (to 1975) and then solely as an entrant until his team’s final season in 1981, when it ran Stefan Bellof in a Ralt RT3 (and Cathy Muller in a Renault 5 Turbo!). Tipped as a future F1 World Champion, Beloff went on to find success but ultimately death in the 956.

    After years of running his cars in variants of the above livery (probably shown here on 935 #9308900020 in 1979), by 1980 he was entering a single 935 (#93089000022) with support from various smaller sponsors and sometimes some additional advertising. That year the car was either white with signwriting as appropriate, as seen here in the hands of Wollek/Schurti during the Nurburgring 1000Km (5th from a grid 2nd)…

    …or in this rather more striking Kraus Hi-Hi colour scheme. It is pictured prior to the Le Mans start , where Wollek/Kelleners began from a grid 10th but failed to finish due to an engine problem. The car subsequently saw very successful service in Australia in the hands of Alan Jones and then Rusty French until at least 1987.

    Note the trestle tables in both pits and the garden chair on the one on the left.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5341

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This is an intriguing photo, not least because I cannot place the location (any suggestions are welcome). The circuit is obviously one where the drivers sometimes sprint to their cars, as indicated by the circles at the track edge, but the pits do not match any that I can recall.

    The duelling 356s of different generations make an interesting ‘spot the difference’ comparison between what appears to be a B in front and an A behind.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5372

    Martin
    Keymaster

    We would certainly welcome some information on this 911. The Qantas sticker on the front implies Australia as the location, although it would have to be an imported car as they use RHD over there.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5374

      Simon Puttick
      Participant

      It’s definitely Jim McKeown and his car ran in this Shell livery at various  times in 1973 and 1974 – your picture seems to match fairly closely to one on Jim’s Facebook page which says it was taken at Baypark Raceway in New Zealand  in 1973. I have read a good internet article on this car and its development, just can’t remember where – the info is out there somewhere …

    • #5375

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Thanks for identifying this one, Simon. It turns out that Australian Jim McKeowen (of McKeowen’s Windscreen City, Melbourne and happily still with us) has some very interesting Antipodean Porsche racing history, initially with a modified 911S 2.4 during 1970/71 and then with the car in our picture in 1973/74, a Carrera RSR which he purchased new and which eventually found its way back to Europe and was restored. With this and and his previous car he certainly held his own against the V8 opposition.

      The Porsche that he used for the 1975 season was something really special though and was built with the cooperation of Australian Porsche importer Alan Hamilton, who also raced a number of interesting Porsches there including a Bergspyder. Constructed from a bare shell and along the lines of an RSR Turbo, it used a 470bhp (declared, but they may have been sandbagging!) 2.1L turbo engine but mounted ahead of the rear axle, as Porsche themselves have done in recent times. Specially constructed subframes carried 908 suspension and the whole weighed in at 670kg, quite a bit lighter than the factory RSRTC.

      Sadly, after racing the car was apparently dismantled, something no doubt related to the regulation change that only allowed Porsches to take part in production racing there from the 1976 season.

  • #5376

    Martin
    Keymaster

    While certainly not of the best quality but however in colour, this is an interesting pre-race view of two 550’s at Reims. That weekend in 1956 there were two 12 Hour races taking place on consecutive days, this one for cars up to 1.5L and another for those above that capacity. Car No.26 (#077) was crewed by Goethals/Goethals and came second to another 550 entered by French Porsche importer Veuillet, while No.29 (#081) of Siedel/Buff failed to finish.

    It was during this event that the well-known French driver Annie Bousquet fatally crashed her 550 that she was sharing with American Isabelle Haskell, something which led the ACO to rather chauvinistically ban women from competing in its events. This restriction lasted until 1971 but looks to have been somewhat arbitrary, as the reason for Bousquet’s crash simply appears to have been fatigue brought about by her races before this one and her driving the car to and from the Porsche works immediately prior to this weekend.

    The circuit was formed of closed public roads and today some surviving buildings still line the section of the D27 that served as the start/finish straight, where the 550’s shown above are lined up in front of the pits and opposite the grandstands, both seen below. The venue saw many Porsches in action until it closed to car racing in 1969, including Dan Gurney almost giving Porsche their first F1 win there in 1961.

    Virtually any Porsche magazine article which involves driving in northern France seems to feature the Rhims pits as a photographic backdrop, although it is only in more recent times that any attempt has been made to save these buildings by repainting their old advertisements and clearing the undergrowth.

    Thirty years ago they were in the state of decay shown in these snaps and had an atmosphere which made far more of a connection with their past than does their present manicured condition, good though it is to see some preservation taking place.

    The large Total structure that gave the positions and results is no more -it was probably removed on the grounds of safety due to corrosion- and I wonder if the BP mosaic still exists somewhere.

    Walking through the old underpass all those years ago there seemed to be other footsteps present – but perhaps it was just an echo!

    It is odd though, that when the soundtrack of the film Le Mans -which has so many Porsche associations- was finally released on CD in France in 2007, it was not the start/finish straight at La Sarthe which featured on its cover but for some reason an atmospheric pre-repaint shot of Reims.

    Photos: MJB/Ted Walker Archive

  • #5400

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Continuing with the Reims theme we see the Behra/Rodriguez 356A Carrera cornering hard during the 1958 12 Hours. While no match for the five Ferrari 250GTO’s filling the top places, they still managed 9th overall and 2nd in class to Storez/von Frankenberg in another 356 Carrera. During the race the car above covered over 1845km during the twelve hours, which is quite an average.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5409

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The 1962 French GP -which had moved from Rhims to Rouen again- was something of a high point in Porsche F1 endeavours. Although starting from a grid 6th Dan Gurney took his 804 to victory by a lap over his nearest rival, giving him and the company their first GP Championship wins. However, shown here in his 804 (#02) is his team mate Bonnier who was not so lucky. Starting from 9th he retired due to a gearbox defect with only a fifth of the race remaining and our picture captures that moment.

    Using his old and outclassed 718/2 de Beaufort still managed to came in 6th and so scored a point too, but even at this stage the writing was on the wall for the factory team and this was to be the last season during which Porsche attempted to replicate in F1 the success that they had enjoyed in sports car racing. Gurney and Bonnier scored a 1-2 later in the year at the Solitude non-Championship GP but, despite these flashes of success, in the drivers and makes championships Gurney and Porsche ended 5th overall with Bonnier only just ahead of privateer de Beaufort.

    There is an excellent colour film of the event here and von Hanstein naturally looks pleased.

  • #5429

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Rain is certainly not unknown at Spa and this is the day of the 1968 1000Km race. The 911T pictured (with its rather misaligned stickers) was driven to a class victory and 11th overall from its 25th starting position by Glemser/Kellners, an excellent result ahead of many faster cars. Although the wet is a great leveller their success should not be underrated.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5443

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The slightly dumpy but not unattractive lines of the 718/2 (#01) of Carel de Beaufort are well displayed in this picture, the Dutch flag proudly worn on its nose on a Dutch orange background. At this stage the rest of the car was still silver, but it would become wholly orange the following month.

    It is seen at the 1962 Solitude non-championship GP where it qualified 8th and finished 5th, adding to the Gurney-Bonnier works Porsche 1-2.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5463

    Martin
    Keymaster

    We get used to seeing 917’s in their Gulf and some of the other more common liveries, but I enjoy seeing these cars in their less usual colour schemes and have always found this distinctive one of Gesipa to be particularly attractive.

    The car (#007) is shown at the Finnish Keimola circuit during a round of the 1970 Interserie Championship where it was driven by Jürgen Neuhaus to 2nd from pole, Porsches comprising eight of the twelve starters including the winner. Beginning as a works LH type with bodywork in the original style, this car raced only once before being rebuilt into the form shown here for 1970. Staying with the Gesipa team for the following year it was converted into a spyder and by 1973 it was with Fox Racing and sporting some unique stabilising tail fins mounted almost in line with the roll bar uprights, along with leading edge front wheelarch extensions. Later the car changed hands again and was returned to short-tail coupe format.

    Keimola was active between 1966 and 1978 but was never financially successful, hence its closure. After years of abandonment and projected redevelopment this finally began to take place a few years ago with the construction of apartment blocks. While much of the circuit still exists -although very much reclamed by the forest in which it sits- the famous but badly fire-damaged circular control tower is somewhat incongruously preserved among the tall buildings and some of the new roads follow the line of the track.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5503

    Martin
    Keymaster

    John Fitzpatrick raced this slightly damaged Kremer 911 Carrera RSR twice at the Norisring on this day in 1974.

    In the DRM race he managed 7th in Division 1 from a grid 11th and in the Norisring Trophy 5th overall, although BMW won both races despite the huge amount of Porsche (and Ford) opposition.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5578

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Nuremberg’s Norisring in 1965, where Gerhard Mitter took the factory-entered 904/8 Bergspyder (#007) to victory from pole position, the car subsequently racing in Australia with Porsche importer Alan Hamilton.

    In another race at the same meeting Udo Schütz came 2nd from a grid 3rd in this 904 (#36); see Post#4971 in our On The Grid section for a picture of the start of this race.

    As will be noted, there was a somewhat casual attitude to protecting the cars and the stonework from damaging each other at this meeting, to say nothing of the safety of the spectators! The section of wall in these pictures looks to be the one on which a memorial to Pedro Rodrigues now sits a little further along, in remembrance of his fatal crash there when racing a Ferrari there in 1971.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5662

    Martin
    Keymaster

    December 1966 marked the final running of the Bahamas Speed Week until its revival in 2011. Taking place at the Oaks Field Course, Nassau, here is the 906 (#133) of American Charlie Kolb being unloaded from the boat which delivered it, perhaps something of a wasted journey as he was classified 43rd (out of 47) and a non-finisher in the Governors Trophy & Nassau Tourist Trophy race pictured below, retiring after only 4 of the 25 laps. However, he had some better luck later in the meeting in a Lola T70.

    Charles A Kolb began racing in the USA in 1955 and used a wide variety of (mainly) sports cars -often of some obscurity- until 1969, including Porsches 356B and Carrera, 718 RSK and RS61, plus 904 and 904/8 Bergspyder. Latterly he also used a 911 and a 906E and as well as competing in many SCCA races he also drove in endurance events at Sebring, Watkins Glen, Daytona and even Le Mans. Kolb was the proprietor of Charlie Kolb’s Auto City in Florida.

    Although Kolb is not visible as the interesting and rather mixed field departs from a Le Mans-type sprint start in this first race of the event, there are a number of Porsches visible. Of the three 906’s nearest the camera we can identify American competitors Peter Gregg (No.14/#106), Ralph Trieschmann (No.56/#148) and Bill Bowman (No.87/#138). Out of view there was Kolb’s 906, a 904, a 911, a 356 Speedster and a 718 RSK in this very eclectic collection of 47 starters, 39 of which finished. Speed differentials must have been a problem -note the Volvo 122S!- in a race won by a V8 Chaparral but Porsches managed 1st/2nd and 1st/2nd/3rd in two of the classes. Gregg, who also took 4th overall and is seen still closing the door while driving away, had purchased the Florida Brumos Porsche dealership just over a year before and while he already had a couple of years Porsche experience under his belt he was to go on to great things with the marque and company before regrettably ending his life.

    Other, but mainly non-Porsche, items of interest to note are the class-winning Austin-Healey Sebring Sprite prototype (No.89) and its fellow Ring Free Oil Racing Team entry, a Shelby GT350 seen almost towering above the racing sports cars. The latter was driven by none other than British Mini, Anglia and sometime endurance racer Anita Taylor, although it looks as though someone is assisting her with her belts while the others get away. Incidentally Anita, who came 24th here and won her class in another of the races, was the sister of GP racer Trevor Taylor and was ostensibly there on her honeymoon! Among the well-known drivers in the race -some later to have Porsche connections- were Pedro Redriguez, Peter Revson, Sam Posey, A J Foyt and Mark Donohue, while Mario Andretti failed to start after damaging his Lola.

    The Bahamas Speed Week had begun in 1954 but the deteriorating surface of the airfield circuit and the reluctance of the government to provide additional financial support were major factors in bringing this popular annual event to a close. By then there were other locations -such as a number in Africa- that could provide warm off-season racing for visiting Europeans, but these were nothing like as convenient for the US drivers as this venue.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5674

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Those rolling sand dunes immediately suggest Zandvoort and this picture was taken at a round of the European Touring Car Championship held there in 1974. The Tebernum Racing Team 911RSR of van Lennep/Bertrams started from 9th but came in 2nd (and won its class by virtue of the other entrant retiring), comfortably ahead of the pursuing BMW Alpina CSL which could only manage 13th.

    One odd thing about this race was that the programme cover featured a picture of an ETCC race at the Nurburgring rather than at the Dutch circuit, the distinctive commentary position being clearly visible.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5703

    Martin
    Keymaster

    An unusual picture taken at the 1963 Austrian GP at Zeltweg in that it shows Austrian driver Kurt Bardi-Barry not only making his only F1 appearance but doing so in a 718/2 (#02) belonging to Carel de Beaufort. Carel was also racing in his original ex-Stirling Moss/Rob Walker 718 and qualified 10th while B-B was a penultimate 16th on the grid. In the race deB finished a decent 3rd but B-B withdrew after three laps.

    This is the car that ended up in the Donington Collection and B-B was killed in a heart attack-induced road accident the following year when still only 25. He was a friend of fellow Austrian and sometime Porsche racer Jochen Rindt -who also took part in the event pictured- and in 1963 they founded Ecurie Vienne to contest the European Formula Junior series.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5718

    Martin
    Keymaster

    An interesting view of the 910 of Meier/Cohen-Olivar which came 5th in the Paris 1000Km at Montlhery in 1970. Pictured on the well-known banking, the car finished 18 laps behind the winning Matra and -as at Monza- a chicane had been constructed to stop the cars entering the banked section at too high a speed. This can be seen in this film of the event, which shows the 910 car along with other Porsche competitors.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5782

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Swede Gert Kaiser raced this 550 (#0045) from new and I think that this view was taken during the Stockholmsloppet race at Skarpnӓck, Sweden in 1955 where he finished 5th. Two years before at this circuit Jo Bonnier had one of his first races in (of all unlikely things) an HRG.

    As can be seen, this circuit near Stockholm was based on a former airfield and offered limited spectator protection, using just earth banks and loose ropes. Constructed for military use in 1940, it subsequently saw service for other aviation activities plus baseball, greyhound racing, alternative social and musical events and even as a drive-in church! It was operational for racing from 1948 to 1969 and was basically triangular, utilising all three runways. The land on which the airfield had been built was part of an ancient family estate that passed into municipal ownership almost 100 years ago and from 1980 the area including the airfield was built over to form Skarpnӓck City.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5811

    Mike Beattie
    Participant

    Phoenix Park is smack in the middle of Dublin and since 1903 the public roads inside the park have been host to motorsport events. The Irish Grand Prix, a Sportscar event was held there in the 1920s & 30 and race meetings were held on various circuit configurations ever since. The paddock was sited in the laneways in the middle of the Park  Here is John L’Amie’s 910 a car he shared with Tommy Reid and Brian Nelson at various circuits across Europe and Japan

  • #5812

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A rare picture of this well turned-out car (#017) in its unusual colour, perhaps taken at the September 1970 event which L’Aime won. Although previous owner Ernst Kraus raced it in yellow it looks to have been freshly painted, which would explain the absence of the red nose that it wore during his ownership and which it still had the previous month; see Porsche On-track>Circuits-UK Post#5408. That looks to be fresh fiberglass under the front wheelarch, so perhaps the repaint was the result of an accident repair?

    The car had a number of distinguished previous drivers, including Schutz and Buzzetta at Le Mans in 1967 when it was a factory entry but failed to finish. L’Aime also entered it for Le Mans in 1971 but it was a reserve and did not appear, although he did race it at Spa, Monza and the Nurburgring. It is interesting to see Brian Nelson’s name cropping up again after his recent appearances in our Rallying>Non-UK section (Posts#5777 on). L’Aime and Nelson even entered a 911 in the 1970 Targa Florio but did not arrive.

  • #5842

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Pictured during a Group 4/Group 6 sports car race at the Swedish Karlsloga circuit in 1968, one of a number of events there to carry the Swedish GP title before the first F1 GP first took place in the country in 1973, this is the 906 (#126) of the Lausanne-based Sportscars Switzerland team. Also known as Sports Cars Unlimited and other variations on the two names, it was driven by Swedish team owner Richard Broström to 7th place in a small but interesting field. He would later graduate to some 910 and 908 models, including a 910 which he had rebodied in Britain with rather angular open bodywork.

    The car went to Portugal the following year and in 1973 underwent conversion into an Aurora 2000 -a good-looking open sports racer- after a highly damaging accident when racing in Angola. Competing in this form until 1977, it then spent twenty years out of use before magically reappearing in the early 2000’s as a Carrera 6 again, although it would have been more interesting if it had remained as an Aurora. It would not have been as valuable though!

    Incidentally, given that circuit racing was banned in Switzerland after the 1955 Le Mans disaster, it is surprising just how many racing teams continued to be or were even subsequently based there. No doubt the position of the country in relation to the rest of Europe assisted in this and Switzerland still produced some top line racing drivers after the ban. While it continued to have a thriving hill climb scene, circuit racing remained outlawed until 2015, although even then only races for electric vehicles were permitted.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5858

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Here is Carel de Beaufort competing in the non-championship 1963 Rome GP at Vallelunga in his 718 (#201), a two heat event where he came second in both races. The field was a something of a mixed bag containing some rather obscure cars and drivers and although practicing fastest (the only pole position of his career) de B was a somewhat distant (11+ and 20+seconds) 2nd overall to Briton Bob Anderson in the DW Racing Lola.

    There is a short film of the event here where de B can be seen motoring strongly, although ultimately there were only three finishers in each heat and note the Porsche trackside advertising. This was the first event on the new two mile ‘international’ configuration of the circuit, an extension of the remodelling designed by Italian GP driver and Mille Miglia winner Piero Taruffi in 1957 of the original 1951 track.

    One other Porsche took part in the race, driven by the Fangio’s protégé Juan Manuel Bordeu, who had some Porsche sports car experience. Driving a 718/2 entered by Count Volpi he practiced 8th but retired with a clutch problem in Heat 1 and so took no further part in the proceedings. Great things had been expected of the Argentinian when he came to Europe, but a leg-breaking testing accident at Goodwood unfortunately put paid to his F1 career just as it was about to start. Despite his previous good results in Formula Junior and a class-winning 5th overall at the Sebring 12H he returned to race in his homeland and represented his country in FISA, the international governing body of motorsport, until his untimely death from leukaemia at only 56.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

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