Hard At Work

This topic contains 17 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Martin 2 days, 1 hour ago.

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  • #3766

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Two drivers hard at work, the first in a 356 with the usual types of modifications to be found in Sports Car Club of America racing. This shot probably dates from the 1970’s when this model was still giving more recent cars a hard time.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    Also hard at work, but this time in taming this 917/10 (#004) during the 1972 Super Sports 200 interserie meeting at Silverstone, is Leo Kinnunen. Coming 1st in heat one and winning heat two made him the overall winner in this Finnish AAW car and he went on to take the championship that year ahead of Willi Kauhsen in another 917/10.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This topic was modified 11 months, 1 week ago by  Martin.
    • This topic was modified 11 months ago by  Martin.
  • #4900

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The driver of this 718 -possibly the Ian Fraser-Jones entry for de Beaufort/Frere at the Nurburgring 1000Km in 1960- looks to have everything under control while pressing on.

    • This reply was modified 10 months, 2 weeks ago by  Martin.
  • #4901

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Given his facial expression Dan Gurney looks to be giving it his all at the 1962 Monaco GP in his 804 (#02). This shot must have been taken in practice, as he was eliminated on the first lap of the race due to an accident caused by the throttle of Ginther’s BRM sticking open. It was a particularly annoying incident for Dan as he had qualified 5th, the same position in which he finished the year in the drivers championship.

  • #5032

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The 1976 Birkett Six Hour Relay race at Silverstone and no-one could accuse the driver of this 911 of not trying! The event still takes place at the same location every October and in 2017 there was a capacity grid of 70 teams racing.

    Taken on the same day as the picture above, this 356 certainly looks to be being driven hard, with a bit of smoke coming off that NSR tyre as it opposite-locks its way through the bend.  Despite this treatment this 1958 1600 has survived to the present and is taxed at the time of writing, although it is now recorded as being blue. It has probably lost those 1970’s streamlined mirrors too, although they rather suit the lines of the car.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5056

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Looking to be wearing some Christmas wrapping paper on its nose (actually a red/blue/green tartan design), this is Mike de’Udy cornering hard and leaning over inside his 904 (#085) at the 1965 Martini international race at Silverstone. Fittingly registered LMG 904C the car came 7th, beaten by some much bigger-engined cars in the main but also beating quite a few of that type. Briton de’Udy -one of the most misspelt men in motor racing- raced widely at home and abroad during the 1960’s and as well as this Porsche he also used two 906’s, although he made the decision to stop racing at 30.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5057

    Martin
    Keymaster

    One of the nice things about these old pictures is the way in which they pause history and let us take in some of the details that we might otherwise have missed, even had we been present at the time. For instance, take this shot of Carel de Beaufort during the 1960 Nurburgring 1000Km, where he shared this 718 RS60 with noted journalist and Porsche enthusiast Paul Frere.

    Carel was really too tall and heavy to be proper racing driver material and whenever you see him pictured in a car like this with a headrest fairing he always towers above it, as he also does above the top of the windscreen. Other items of note are the spare goggles on his helmet (with it’s leather ear flaps), the casually open collar and the substantial frame tubes visible inside the car. During the race a long pit stop dropped the pair to 27th position but thanks to a charging drive by Frere they eventually made 9th overall and 3rd in class.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5146

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Veteran competitor Tony Lanfranchi is seen pressing on at Silverstone in 1983 when contesting the Uniroyal Production Sports Car Championship in the AFN 928.

  • #5173

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The 2nd and 3rd place 911s are shown at the European Touring Car Championship round which took place at Snetterton in April 1968. No.79 is the Kremer entry of Kremer/Pesch which was only two laps adrift of the winning Mustang after 115 laps, while No.74 is the British pairing of Hunter/Grant. Both drivers look to be giving nothing away here.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5263

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The Guards Trophy, one of the well-known series of sports and GT races, was held at Snetterton in April 1969 and here we see Charlie Lucas pressing on to 4th overall and 1st in class from a grid 7th. He is driving Patrick McNally’s 910 (#028) which he had previously driven for him in a number of African races during the preceding European winter. He subsequently went on to race a couple of other 910’s too and these were great looking cars, although they have come to be rather overshadowed by the subsequent 917.

    McNally also bought new one of the three RHD (out of a total of 35) 911T/R models which Lucas also raced on a few occasions and which still exists (in fact, we were looking at it only last weekend). The Guards Trophy name has latterly been applied to historic races for some cars of similar types to the original competitors and refers to the then well-known brand of Carreras cigarettes.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5355

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Taken at Porsche’s Weissach proving ground, this is an unrecorded car and driver combination. Whoever it is behind the wheel of this 908/3 is certainly trying though.

    This might just be #001, a car that was never raced in period and was used only for development work.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5356

      Simon Puttick
      Participant

      I have seen a blurry photo of a yellow 908-3 test car with what looks to be tacked on bare metal wing uprights at the back – the only logical reason I can think of for this test car being yellow is that it’s the #15 car from the 1970 Nurburgring 1000 kms with the wings added on to test them as part of the development of the 1971 season  – does anyone know if this is correct or not – any info or photos would be a big help as I’d like to make a 1/43 model of this mystery 908-3

    • #5358

      Martin
      Keymaster

      That’s an interesting theory, Simon, as the yellow No.15 than ran in the 1970 1000Km (#003, below) does not appear to have raced again after that outing, so it might have become a development car.

      Indeed, it had only raced once before, as a T-car (below) on the Targa Florio a few weeks previously when it looked decidedly tatty, or at least as though just finished.

      The plain yellow it wore for the 1000Km was an unusual choice for entrants Porsche Salzburg too, perhaps related to its Shell sponsorship, although some red might also have been expected. They certainly had a habit of turning out 908’s and 917’s in ‘non-corporate’ colours from time to time. Driving together prior to their forthcoming historic Le Mans victory, Herrmann and Attwood finished 2nd at the ‘Ring from a grid 4th, beaten by the other team 908/3 (which was white!).

      Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5783

      Guderian
      Participant

      908/3-003

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks ago by  Guderian.
    • #5809

      Martin
      Keymaster

      It looks like a unanimous vote for the car being #003, so let’s take a look at its history.

      Initially used for the development of the 908/3 prior to its outing on the Targa as a T-car (Post#5358), where Redman and Siffert used it to gather set-up information, it then did its one race in yellow livery (Post#5358) for Porsche Salzburg. After that it returned to a testing role, where our other picture (Post#5355) must have been taken, as it was during this time that it acquired those tail fins that were to be used on the model in 1971. At some point in this second development period it was crashed, although to what extent is unknown.

      In 1973 it was sold by the factory to well-known Porsche racer Hans-Dieter Blatzheim and later passed to the equally well-known 908 racer Siggi Brunn, possibly still in a damaged condition. In support of his other 908 activities -he used #011, 012 & 013 and was still racing one internationally in 1983- Brunn is said to have acquired this car and other 908 components from various sources and although #003 underwent a very gradual rebuild in his ownership it did not return to the track until it was tested in 2001! In 2004 -and still in Brunn’s ownership- it had its first of a number of outings in historic events in his and from 2007 another owners hands and when it changed ownership again it was restored to concours standard in Germany for its Austrian buyer.

      Today presented in the livery it wore at the Nurburgring in 1970, it was sold for $3,375,000 in 2017.

  • #5405

    Issac Grealish
    Participant

    It is interesting to read your blog post and I am going to share it with my friends.

    Herbew Fentos

    • #5406

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Many thanks for your interest and please spread the word.

  • #5673

    LarrySouza
    Participant

    These old cars made my day today I think it is very interesting to know about the history, about how our ancestors used to play essay writing services uk type of games and what type of cars or motorbike they use. It was nice to read this information.

  • #5865

    Martin
    Keymaster

    In its first year of competition this 935 (#002) won its two initial races, but it was not to be third time lucky here at the Silverstone Six Hours in 1976. Although Ickx/Mass put the car on pole, the best that they could manage was 10th and last in this inaugural running of this race after Ickx gave the clutch a hard time at the start, the winning BMW finishing 51 laps ahead of them. This picture captures the fact that the chassis engineers (not to mention the transmission designers) were still trying to come to terms with the power that these turbocharged engines delivered and not always in the most predictable of ways.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

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