Modified Road Cars

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Martin 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #5207

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Dage Sport were at one time a big name in Porsche conversions. Situated in Aylesbury, they produced highly modified road cars, such as their flatnose DS935 and a Carrera GT-style body conversion for the 924. The company was run by John Gresley, later becoming G Force Motorsport and number of those who worked for him subsequently became independent Porsche specialists. Gresley, who had started his Porsche competition driving in rallycross, was well-known on the circuits in his cars -latterly sponsored by Blue Coral- which included a 935 K3 and even a 911 GT1.

    Above is an example of the sort of road cars that Dage Sport produced, pictured outside their impressive building and wearing an appropriately spaced registration that appeared on a number of their conversions. In the mid-1980s such a 930SE lookalike (with around 400bhp) would cost perhaps half the price of a genuine factory version, although I was recently interested to learn that the rising value of original 930’s has seen the reconversion of at least two Dage Sport DS935’s back into standard cars.

    By way of a comparison with the car above, here is a real 930SE being delivered to Porsche Cars GB when new. Another picture of this car can be seen in Post#5511 below and note the reflection of the 911 cabriolet on the upper deck of the transporter and the 944’s inside the building.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5208

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A nicely modified 914 which looks to be pictured in the Brands Hatch paddock.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5293

    Martin
    Keymaster

    At first glance you might be forgiven for dismissing this car as just another 914, but note that front opening for its oil cooler. This is the second of two eight cylinder versions of this model (#914006) built by Porsche, shown on the occasion of its presentation to Ferry Porsche on his 60th birthday in 1969 (the sort of birthday present we’d all like!). Although incorporating a number of body differences, the 260bhp car looked remarkably standard and was used extensively before retiring to the factory collection.

    The location is the Porsche family estate at Zell am See in Austria and aside from Ferry in the foreground note that Butzi is also present, smartly turned out in a pair of breeks and smoking his pipe. His Porsche Design business would later market a pipe of his own design.

  • #5367

    Martin
    Keymaster

    While Rainer Buchmann’s b+b concern has undertaken many projects not related to Porsches, it is with that marque that he is firmly identified. Founded in Frankfurt in 1974, the company produced modified Porsches of high quality in design and manufacture until 1986 and in 2014 returned with a modern reinterpretation of its original concept.

    On the left is the car that started it all, the 911 Turbo Targa Rainbow. Giving the 911 Targa a 930-style body and Turbo power along with a luxury interior tapped into a market completely overlooked by the factory and alongside and below is the b+b take on the 924, a less commercially successful but very good-looking reinterpretation of the base model in the Porsche range

    The next Porsche to receive the b+b treatment was an equally unlikely one in the form of the 928. For this the company carried out extensive modifications to create a T-bar convertible via two removable panels, along with modifications to the front and rear that radically -but successfully-altered the appearance of the car.

    Subsequently b+b returned to the 928 for a full convertible version, a car whose appearance might have led the uninitiated to assume that it was a factory model.

    The 911 Targa was at the heart of their Porsche conversions though (in Turbo or naturally aspirated form) and these passed through a number of generations. On this version the Fuchs wheels have been supersceded by those from BBS and with a nod to the factory 930SE a slant nose incorporated. However, rather than using the 924-type headlamps found on the works versions b+b used a 928 system to good effect.

    Later still a further set of changes gave the car a more radical appearance, with rear wing cooling ducts extending forward into the doors and three piece dished and ducted BBS wheels, not to mention various interior revisions and up to 370bhp.

    The show stand above also publicises the b+b Deinfos multi-function and talking electronic dashboard, one of a number of innovations such as parking sensors and remote central locking which the company pioneered.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5592

      Martin
      Keymaster

      With a number of b+b models present this looks to be a still from the 1980 film Car-napping. Rainer Buchmann was involved in the production in a number of ways, including sourcing the 40 Porsches used in the Paris sequence and supplying the b+b Mercedes C111 for a role in the film.

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5511

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Another view of the 930SE shown at the head of this section, being backed off the transporter very carefully! It appears that this car was the first RHD example imported and was used as the Porsche Cars GB demonstrator. Registered in November 1985 and initially carrying the number 911 HUL -as did so many other press 911’s- its special red leather interior with Recaro seats can be better seen in Post#5207 above. At over twice the price of a normal 930 and with 330bhp these were rare cars, particularly in RHD form. Happily the car is still on the road, having been extremely well looked-after over only 34000 miles and has only recently passed into the hands of its sixth owner.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5517

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Another view of TUR 80W (arranged as TURBO W) shown at the head of this section. It is seen on a photo shoot at an as yet unknown location and even by the mid-1980’s that window display was a little antiquated!

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5573

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Modified Porsches can very much be a case of one man’s meat being another man’s poison and that must be especially true when it comes to the 928. Both of these examples are from 1987 and above we see the German Strosek Auto Design reworking of the car. The 928 had been their first project when Vittorio Strosek founded the company in 1982 and with them the model passed through four series. This third generation version exhibits some of the distinctive changes that were made, although like most small-scale modifiers there were sometimes variations within each series.

    They also produced a competition 928 for the 1993 ADAC GT races and while in Porsche terms are probably best known for their modified 911’s they also modified the 944 Turbo, along with more recent models and various other makes.

    Looking a little more restrained is this Swiss Rinspeed offering. Founded in 1979 by Frank Rinderknecht (and like Strosek the founder still heads the company), the firm modified its first Porsche in 1983 and since its initial 911 and 928 projects has pursued the creation of many original and revolutionary vehicles in parallel with its work on production models, Porsche and others.

    While their 911 R69 with its Ferrari Testarossa-style side strakes may be memorable, the power boats which they made utilising 928 engines are probably less well known, one being fitted with two of these units!

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

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