Pit & Paddock

This topic contains 50 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Martin 1 hour, 49 minutes ago.

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  • #4959

    Martin
    Keymaster

    It’s not every day that you see a Peugeot 404 in the pit lane at Le Mans and why are there so few spectators opposite in this 1968 view despite all the activity in the pits? I initially wondered if it was the April test day rather than the main event (which was held in Spetember that year due to the civil unrest in the country), but it was a 908 that carried No.35 on that occasion and since this is a 907 it must be the 907LH (#005) entered by Solar-Roig for himself and Lins in the 24 Hours. This shot captures the beautiful shape of this long-tail version and while it qualified 13th it did not finish due to engine oil loss.

    Presumably the shot was captured prior to the beginning of the practice sessions and it may be that the Spaniard was renting the car from the works as it still carries its German registration. Not easily visible against the white background are the long fins on either side of the tail and that chap in the sports jacket certainly looks to be giving the car some thought.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4960

    Martin
    Keymaster

    During 2017 Richard Attwood raced a Porsche Cars GB-entered 928 in honour of the 40th anniversary of the model and so I thought that we should look back to 1983 when the model was still in production and AFN were running one on the circuits. Normally raced by Tony Lanfranchi, I think that we see it here during the Willhire 24 Hours at Snetterton, where in the hands of Win Percy/Andy Rouse/Tony Dron/Phil Dowsett it won from pole.

    Although generally regarded as being a bit heavy for racing a number of 928’s have tried their hands on the circuits, including the French car that raced at Le Mans and some others that competed in Britain in club championships.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 10 months ago by  Martin.
  • #4961

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This picture and the next were taken at the 1969 BOAC 500 at Brands Hatch, although it is not clear if the shots were taken in practice (likely) or during the race and both cars bear some damage. Taking these works entries in chassis number order, this is the 908/2K (#007) of Herrmann/Stommelen which qualified and finished 6th but had a rather short career, as Elford crashed it when using it as a T-car on the Targa Florio the following month.

    Turning to its sister, this is a 980/2K (#011) which with equal consistency came home 1st from pole in the hands of Siffert/Redman. Subsequently this car had quite a career, passing to the AAW team later that year and being widely raced and then in 1970 sold to well-known British Porsche privateer Tony Dean. He used it in North America for the Can-Am series before it was sold to Dick Barbour the following year to be similarly employed before it came into the hands of Vasek Polak, as did so many American Porsche racing cars. Dick Barbour had some considerable Porsche history from the 1960’s and finished 2nd at Le Mans in his 935 with Paul Newman (and Rolf Stommelen) in 1979.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4962

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A 906 makes its way through a paddock, perhaps at Brands Hatch. The car is finished in the same colour scheme as the one used by Richard Shardlow in the late 1960s so may well be his #144, although by the time that this picture was taken its nose bore the scares of contact.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 10 months ago by  Martin.
  • #4965

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Ignoring a couple of marks on this print, here is a shot taken at the Daytona 24 Hours in 1979. It shows the modified Miami Auto Racing 911S of Mummery/Sheehy/Sereix which qualified 44th and finished 16th, despite being a non-runner by the end of the race due to differential failure. It was still not a bad result out of 67 starters and they managed 522 laps before retiring, which equates to fractionally under 2000 miles.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4966

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This started as an uncaptioned slide but I believe that we are looking at a 550 (#0015 or #0082) of Equipe Nationale Belge and with a bit of detective work involving the two Lancia D50s beside it I think that this view may date from May 1956. By that time the Lancia GP team had ceased to race and their cars had been taken over by Ferrari and renamed: Note that these two bear Modena temporary registrations. Yellow is certainly an unusual colour for a 550, but of course it is the Belgian national racing colour.

    The ENB team (sometimes also appearing as Ecurie National Belge) had been formed from the merging of the two famous Belgian racing organisations Ecurie Francorchamps and Ecurei Belge, running cars in GP and sports car racing and even constructing their own F1 cars out of a pair of Emeryson-Maseratis, although to little effect. As to the location of this shot, despite the LHD Fiat 1100 and the Swiss-registered BP support vehicle or transporter, Ted and I agree on Silverstone and the D50s did race there in May and July that year. The weather makes it look like the former and all in all this is an evocative paddock shot, including some mechanics working on a car with a big inline engine behind the Porsche.

    Why the doubt as to which 550 is shown? We know that #0015 was there but did not race after dropping a valve but the car in the picture looks to have the registration normally carried by #0082. Was the latter also there or are we looking at the registration of #82 being carried on #15? I have lost count of the number of instances that there have been of racing cars swopping registration and chassis numbers for various reasons, particularly when going from one country to another. Just to further complicate things, the car was due to run as No.16 on this occasion not 19, although competitors turning up at meetings still bearing the number from a previous event is also not unknown.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5011

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A 956 (#109) is seen during a night stop at Le Mans in 1983, where Desiré Wilson joind regular drivers Lassig and Plankenhorn to take an excellent 7th from a grid 12th. The car was entered by Obermaier Racing in the distinctive BOSS suit, shirt and bow tie livery, making it the best-dressed car at LM that year! By this stage of the race the nose has already suffered some abrasion from track debris.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5047

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A trio of Camoradi 718RSK’s (all #unknown) pictured in the Bahamas -and behind barbed wire!- for the annual Nassau Speed Week in 1959. The car in the centre was raced by Jo Bonnier and although the far one carries the name of Jack McAfee he also raced the car in the foreground. While Bonnier is a familiar Porsche competitor McAfee was also a prolific American Porsche racer from the mid-1950’s to the early 1960’s and on this occasion they finished 1st and 2nd respectively in their class. The American Camoradi team was a short-lived organisation perhaps best remembered for its ‘Birdcage’ Maseratis, the rather Italian-sounding name actually taking the first two letters from the words that made up the full team name, Castner Motor Racing Division. They raced some other Porsches too during their brief existence, including the unique Behra-Porsche single-seater.


    Car No.30 which is just visible in the background is an OSCA S187 which later also ran as part of the Camoradi team. On this occasion it was driven by American Denise McCluggage (1927-2015) who as well as being a highly respected motoring journalist also raced and rallied during the 1950’s and 1960’s and could often be seen competing in a 550RS.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5101

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Some factory mechanics hitch a ride on the 904 (#091) of Koch/Fischhaber at Le Mans in 1965. A works car and finished in the usual silver, it had its bonnet less usually painted in two additional colours for identification purposes instead of the normal one. Starting from 34th -grid positions are almost irrelevant at Le Mans to all but the front runners- the car finished 5th and took a class victory too, the second Porsche home and only 23 laps behind the winning Ferari 250LM.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5133

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Here misleadingly showing No.8 (the preceding 2 is missing) at Le Mans in 1970 is the Martini team 908/2 (#009) of Spoerry/de Cortanze/Lins. Unfortunately, during practice Spoerry had a huge accident involving a Matra that completely destroyed the car (even the engine was detached) although he literally walked away unscathed, albeit minus his boots!

    There is a lot of confusion between #009 and #019 which appears to arise from the latter being renumbered as the former, apparently during the ownership of Vasek Polak in America. As is well known, there are various reasons as to why racing car chassis numbers get reused, temporarily reallocated or even divided and sometimes these are legitimate (or at least explicable), although not always of course. In this case #009 looks to have been crashed at Le Mans in June 1970 while #019 appears to have been racing at Watkins Glen a month later, whatever happened subsequently.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5139

    Martin
    Keymaster

    An unidentified 906 is seen in this interesting view taken at the Mugello Grand Prix sports car race in 1968.

    Next to it is a real rarity though, a De Sanctis sports racer (almost inevitably of ‘Gero’) from a firm better known for their small single-seaters. These were often driven by Jonathan Williams, who also raced the 908/2K camera car at Le Mans 1970 (see our LM thread) while it gathered footage for the forthcoming Le Mans film and who had one of two other Porsche outings.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  Martin.
    • #5328

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Simon Puttick replied:

      surely that’s a 910 rather than a 906 at Mugello 1968?

       

      Martin replied:

      Thanks for pointing this out, Simon. The shape of the 906 and 910 headlamps are totally different; what was I thinking?!

      Like the 906’s there were also five 910’s entered in the race (two of which didn’t start after practice accidents) and while I have a pretty good idea as to which of those cars this isn’t, I can’t be sure which one it actually is. The Piccionaia Racing Team entry might be a likely candidate though.

       

      Simon Puttick replied:

      the Piccionaia 910 was orange and blue, at least it was at the Targa Florio

      the Bradley car usually (but not always) had a central blue stripe

      I have a black and white picture of the Gano car (courtesy of the Racing Sportscar site) and it doesn’t have a coloured nose like the one in the photo

      the Hart Ski car usually (but again not always) had logos over the rear wheel arches

      so maybe it’s the Koch car before the practice accident?

       

      Martin replied:

      I think that you’re right, as a bit more digging has confirmed that the Piccionaia No.8 raced here in its rather striking Targa livery. As you say, the Bradley No.6 was usually basically white, the Gano N0.14 white with a coloured front lid, and the Hart Ski No.21 white with a red nose (as shown under Circuits – Non-UK). Incidentally, the car in our picture looks as though it might have similar rear wheelarch extensions to those on the Hart-Ski car.

      As to a chassis number, how about #009? Like the car in our picture this had a light blue front lid when it was a works car and had been raced privately by Koch at Monza a few months before, although he subsequently also raced #010. It seems plausible that the orange nose could just have been added to the existing white/blue factory livery.

       

      Simon Puttick replied:

      sounds about right to me – good work

      • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  Martin.
      • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  Martin. Reason: Original posts edited and combined due to a software error separating them
  • #5170

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Georg Loos was a familiar Porsche team owner during the 1970’s and 1980’s. Here is one of his GELO 935’s (#9307700908) at Le Mans scrutineering in 1977 (with another just visible in front), the additional lamps with which it raced having not yet been fitted.

    Although the car qualified 9th it all came to a sad end on only lap 15 of 343 when the engine let go in a big way, as can be seen here. This meant that only Tim Schenken got a session, but along with teammates Heyer and Hezemans they switched to another Loos car, which ultimately also failed to finish.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5206

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Looking as though it has stopped suddenly and shed is nose, this is the 956B (#114) of John Fitzpatrick’s Skoal Bandit team at the 1984 Silverstone 1000Km. Driven by Boutsen/Hobbs to an 8th place from a grid 5th, behind it can be see the other team 956 (#110) of Keegan/Edwards that did rather better, coming home 3rd from a grid 10th. For some reason the latter car is on wet tyres, but perhaps it has only just arrived in the pit lane for what looks to be unofficial practice.

    During a period when tobacco advertising was still permitted on racing cars Skoal was unusual in that it was a ‘dipping’ tobacco, one that is held in the mouth rather than smoked. At the time I recall that I assumed that it was a tobacco substitute, so with no indication as to what the product actually was their advertising may have missed the mark with others as it did with me.

    At the same event #110 can just be seen along with a couple of crew members and its driver Rupert Keegan, who is apparently smoking next to the fuel filling/metering device behind the open door! Keegan, British F3 Champion in 1976, generally had more success in sports prototypes than in his GP and CART careers.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5227

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This shot of Georg Loos -on the right in the red GELO team jacket- contemplating the body damage and the driver contemplating Loos provides something of a wordless caption. It was taken at Silverstone in 1977 where this team 935 (9307700908) was crewed by Stommelen/Hezemans (pictured) and came home 3rd from a grid 4th by way of compensation for the slight accident. Some of the pit crew look to be wearing red Porsche factory overalls, although all are unusually dirty.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5238

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Martin Hone was a well-known British racer who used this 904 (#097) nationally and internationally and it is seen here in the Castle Combe paddock in May 1966.

    The Birmingham businessman and BRDC member was behind the Opposite Lock night club in that city and was also a prime mover in the staging of the city’s Super Prix races, which featured Porsche Club Championship races as part of the supporting events.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by  Martin.
  • #5252

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The Martini livery has appeared on many racing cars, but only on one occasion did it appear on a 936 (#001) with black rather than white as the base colour. That was at the 1976 Nurburgring 300Km, where it finished 5th from a grid 2nd in the hands of Rolf Stommelen.

    The colour scheme was an interesting variation on the norm but Martini thought it lacking in photographic impact when racing and so white was used subsequently. Visible under its race number can still be seen the ‘6’ that it carried in the pre-event publicity pictures and the two non-finishing Alpines can just be seen on the left and right.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5259

    Martin
    Keymaster

    I have seen this 1962 picture of Jo Bonnier in the Scuderia SSS 718/2 (#03) captioned as having been taken in Belgium, but that is not the case. Although it wears the number from its outing in the IV Grand Prix de Bruxelles two weeks before (where it came 2nd), the location is actually Snetterton where it looks to have recently been unloaded from the trailer in the background by the smart-casual Bonnier.

    The car was there to contest the non-championship Lombank Trophy F1 race and came home 3rd, a lap down on Clark and Hill, after starting from 8th. The obviously modest Scuderia team (at times Serenissima or SSS Republica de Venezia) contrasts with the BRM transporter behind and one of their cars under its monogrammed cover. The team was run by the Italian Count Volpi for ten years, entering a variety of cars in GP and sports car racing, building a couple of prototype road cars and even briefly supplying an engine to Bruce McLaren for F1 use.

    The Scuderia was also connected with Porsche in sports car racing, entering open and closed eight cylinder 718’s (#046/7) in the 1962 Targa Florio, the Vaccarella/Bonnier coupe being finished in the same odd shade of red as Bonnier’s F2/GP car above.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5284

    Martin
    Keymaster

    An interesting view of what looks to be an undressed 917/30, although chassis number, date and location are as yet unknown. The rather bored-looking people include what appear to be some factory mechanics and at least we get to see some parts of the 917 that are not normally on view.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5294

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Although a rare Opel Kapitan P1 dominates this picture -date and location unknown- it is hauling the 356B behind it to or from a competitive event using a rigid towing device. Two spare wheels for the 356 sit on the back seat of the Opel, so presumably the boot was full of tools and perhaps spares. This was quite an unusual way to move a racing car around even then, but it was perhaps more easily done on the less crowded roads of the past. The owner was certainly proud enough of his ‘equipe’ to take a picture of it.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5334

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Taken before his second lap spin on some oil that also caused the elimination of two other cars, this is the 718/2 (#01) of von Trips undergoing some slight adjustment at the Monaco GP in 1959. This was the debut of the first open wheel Porsche single seater and although built to the 1.5L F2 specification introduced for 1957, it was created with an eye to the fact that from 1961 F1 was also to become a 1.5L formula. Indeed, it was the F2 entries, drawing as they did on the post-war 500cc F3 racers, that were in the vanguard of rear-engined cars in GP racing.

    The 718/2 had qualified halfway down the field, just ahead of Bruce McLaren’s Cooper T51 seen in the background and was the only Porsche entered apart from Maria Teresa de Fillipis in the Bhera-Porsche. It was an unfortunate debut for the works 718/2 and it was quite badly damaged, although von Trips escaped with a cut to his face. Due to Porsche’s sports-racing commitments it would be another five GP races before the car was rebuilt and ready to reappear in the series.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5354

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Vic Elford is seen getting into or out of a works 908/2K (#018) in the Nurburgring paddock at the 1969 1000Km meeting. Porsche were obviously taking the event seriously that year with a total of seven 908’s present, although two of those were T-cars including this one. In the race this turnout gave them 1st/2nd/3rd/5th/31st, with a Porsche Salzburg 908 coming home 4th and the difficult-handling early 917 that none of the works drivers wanted to race came in a very creditable 8th in the hands of David Piper/Frank Gardner.

    There were also plenty of Porsche privateers among the 65(!) starters and in the background we can see the transporter of British racer Bill Bradley. He shared his 910 with Tony Dean to take a good 12th overall after qualifying 34th.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5369

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Ignoring the timekeeper’s leg, a bottle of Lucozade and the proverbial oily rag, let’s concentrate on David Piper’s 917 (#010) in the Brands Hatch pits during practice for the 1970 BOAC 1000. The car, which Piper was sharing with David Hobbs, qualified near to the bottom of the grid in 31st position but was unable to start due to a camshaft problem.

    This car has been in Piper’s ownership since he bought it in 1969 and still gets used today. It has carried a number of liveries relating to short term sponsorship deals in addition to his well-known and distinctive green also to be found on his Ferraris and Lola T70. For instance, during this year I can think of it carrying at least four colour schemes, although the sponsorship from US hamberger chain Wetsons was rather unusual in Europe, apparently relating to Tony Adamowicz who co-drove in the next race at Monza and had previously co-driven with Herb Wetanson of Wetsons. Wetanson raced a number of Porsches in the States, including a 906 that ran as a spyder for a time.

    In fact, it seems likely that this 917 raced with more variations to its appearance in period than any other example.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5377

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Seen refuelling at Silverstone during practice on a sunny day in 1984 is the Joest 956 (#104) of Klaus Ludwig/Henri Pescarolo. The New Man livery really suited these cars.

    The meeting was the 1000Km, where the car qualified 6th and finished 2nd to one of the works cars and at left we can see Pescarolo putting on his helmet. He is a man who has a long association with endurance racing, initially as a driver and then as an entrant and also a constructor.

  • #5399

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Some shots of this 935/77 (#004) in the pits during practice for the 1977 Mugello Six Hours.

    Below, two mechanics in Martini overalls work on the car while the other four watch and note the slightly Heath Robinson stays supporting the riveted-on front lip.

    The car qualified 1st in the hands of Mass/Barth but went out after brake failure caused it to have an accident.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5418

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Finished in an attractive colour scheme which is complimented by its BBS wheels, this is the 935/77A (#9308900012) of Schornstein/Grohs/von Tschirnhaus lined up in the pit lane at Le Mans in 1980. The car qualified 11th and finished 8th, also winning its Group 5 class, although it was the self-driven Rondeau that triumphed overall.

    In that period (and for a while longer) the pits were still the basic concrete edifices of some antiquity and are quite a contrast to the facilities enjoyed by the teams today. From the paddock behind you were able to climb up to a viewing gallery on top of them, which gave an interesting and useful vantage point.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5435

    Martin
    Keymaster

    We must try to find a colour picture of this car as it has a very attractive red and yellow livery. Despite this combination and being entered by driver Louis Cosson here at Le Mans in 1971, this 908/2K (#016) claims to be part of the Esso Racing Team and Helmut Leuze was the other driver. The car qualified 22nd by was disqualified during the race for a regulation infringement involving taking on more oil.

    Subsequently entered by Christian Poirot for the next two Le Mans it only registered an unclassified and a failure to qualify, so this was not a very successful circuit for this car.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5436

      Simon Puttick
      Participant

      I have a number of colour photos of this car, gathered over many years from the net as part of my picture library that helps me make 1/43 scale Porsche models – the problem of course is I can’t remember where I got them from (tho’ probably a lot have come from the French Forum Auto site) so the copyright situation is unclear

      the car ran elsewhere in these colours during 1971 but I only have a single shot of it at Auvergne

    • #5437

      Martin
      Keymaster

      I would suggest that a good compromise in this situation might be to credit a picture source as ‘Unknown’ and if anyone later claims it the picture can then be credited or if necessary taken down. I rather suspect that a lot of the pictures that appear on the internet in various ways are not posted by their copyright holders anyway!

  • #5464

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Taken at the 1968 Oulton Park 100 Miles race, this is Geoff Edmonds’ 906 (#133) which was driven by Chris Ashmore to a good 6th place against some stiff opposition. This car had an extensive competition career which began in the US and after racing in Europe it was still winning in Angola in 1974. The sophisticated means of transporting it will be noted!

    Parked next to the car in the shot below can be seen Porsche privateer Tony Dean’s Ferrari Dino 206S. It finished 3rd that day and is still wearing its BOAC sticker from the Brands Hatch Six Hours.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5497

    Martin
    Keymaster

    It’s all action around J Delmar-Morgan’s 906 (#135) which he shared with Mike Walton in the 1968 BOAC 500 at Brands Hatch, with refuelling, a driver change and attention to the tyres. This may be a practice session given the number of people milling around and this car (like the one in the previous post) looked good in its less common red finish. The pair qualified 29th and although they did not complete the race due to a driveshaft problem they had covered enough distance to be classified 22nd and last.

    The car can be seen in the same race in Post#5241 of On The Grid.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5516

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Some serious work on a GELO 911 RSR 2.8 allows us an opportunity to inspect its engine.

    I think that this shot might have been taken at the Norisring in 1974, where the car was driven by Herbert Müller to 3rd from a grid 6th.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5542

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Some pictures of Paddock Porsche People:

    1989/90 B F Goodrich Porsche Championship

    1977 Le Mans, 936 #001 or 002

    1970 Monza 1000Km, 917K probably #009

    1989/90 B F Goodrich Porsche Championship

    1977 Le Mans, 936 #001 or 002

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5547

      Martin
      Keymaster

      A couple of paddock shots of Pedro Rodriguez:

      1962 Le Mans, when he was driving a Ferrari, the make he raced most often.

      1970 Targa Florio, where he came 2nd in a 908/3, here accompanied by his father and J-M Fangio.

      Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5556

      Martin
      Keymaster

      1970, Imola and some of the Gulf crew look happy about Redman’s JW917 victory.

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5566

      Martin
      Keymaster

      1970, Le Mans with Steve McQueen, Louise Edlind (left) and Elga Andersen (right) on location when filming Le Mans.

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5695

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Precise date/location unknown, one of those 1970/71 works jackets which were also available in a reversal of these colours, although that version was always less common. Porsche reproduced these garments a few years ago.

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5549

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This 935/77A (#9308900022) run by the Kremer team appeared in 1978 in a few different liveries before they stuck a deal with Minolta. It is seen here during some pit work at the Nurburgring 1000km at a time when that race had become the preserve of Group 5 and Touring/GT cars running to the World Championship for Makes and the World Challenge for Endurance Drivers regulations of the day.

    This meant that a huge number of Porsches were entered (31, out which 13 were 935’s) and after setting the second fastest practice time this car finished 1st and 3rd in the two heats, giving Wollek/Pescarolo a 3rd overall on aggregate. For a later view of this car, see Post#5593 below.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5593

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Taken at Snetterton during Round Two of the 1983 Thundersports series, this is the smartly turned out 1978 935K3 (#9308900022) of Brian Robinson/Dudley Wood. By now approaching the end of its competition career (see Post#5549 above), the Robinson Demolition team used it into the following year and note that there is another 911 derivative in the pit garage.

    Seen here during a pit stop for fuel and a driver change, we can see from the board behind that the car was lying third at this point, although it finished 6th.

    Prior to this ownership the car had notched up quite a history. It ran as a Kremer team car for its first two years before passing to Charles Ivey Racing for the next three. During this these five seasons it was raced widely and competed at Le Mans four times:  1978 (DNF), 1979 (13th), 1980 (DNF) and 1981 (4th), also taking the Group 5 win from the works Lancias on the latter occasion.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5633

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This may not be the best-composed of photographs but it is full of atmosphere. Pictured at the 1963 Nurburgring 1000Km, Phil Hill is having a rare outing in a works Porsche. The car is the 8-cylinder 718GTR (#046) which failed to finish for the second year running, although this time it was an accident which put it out rather than a mechanical failure.

    This less usual rear view allows us to appreciate some of the details of this car, such as the hinges for the engine cover, the way the doors cut into the roof and the huge air scoops. Phil Toll Hill Jr had his first Porsche outing in 1956 but was primarily and successfully a Ferrari racer.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5707

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The JW pit prior to practice at the 1971 Monza 1000Km has the appearance of having been invaded by a group of lifeboatmen due the Gulf rainwear worn by the mechanics, although crew chief Ermanno Cuoghi has chosen different headgear. All of the JW and Martini 917K’s apart from the T-car have their fitted covers (and a liberated SEV banner) placed over their door apertures, presumably as these had less than perfect sealing.

    From neatest the camera we see the JW cars #013/034 of Rodriguez/Oliver (G:5th/F:1st), #004/017 of Siffert/Bell (G:7th/F:2nd) and the #016 T-car which was practiced by Bell/Oliver to 7th fastest. Visible behind are the Martini 917 entries which were unable to maintain their challenge to the well-prepared and highly organised JW team on this occasion, #020 of Elford/Larousse (although he didn’t get to drive, G:1st/DNF) and #019 of Marko/van Lennep (G:12th/DNF). The nose of the Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 (F:3rd) being shared by frequent Porsche driver Henri Pescarolo can also just be seen.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5752

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Two scenes taken in the pit lane at the Goodwood Tourist Trophy in 1959 and showing the works team of 718RSK’s. This view features the car of Barth/Maglioli which came 12th from a grid 3rd and clearly visible are the inlet and outlet that allowed air to pass through the oil cooler. The size of the inlet scoop had increased a number of times since the cars were introduced, as had its position.

    Still recognisably the Goodwood pits -although not as immaculate as they are today- below we see the above car behind those of Herrmann/Bristow (24), grid 18th but a non-finisher after an accident and von Trips/Bonnier (22). The latter pair were the most successful, starting down in 10th place but coming home 2nd and also winning their class.

    The pairing of Herrmann with the young British driver Chris Bristow is an interesting one, particularly as he was the antithesis of the type of driver that Porsche usually employed. Bristow was not even 22 at the time and while showing an undeniable talent he had already gained a reputation for a somewhat wild and accident-prone racing style since beginning in the sport at 18. His early start was no doubt helped by his being the son of a garage owner, but perhaps this and being taken on by Ken Gregory’s British Racing Partnership F1 team for 1960 gave him too much too soon.

    That year his approach and his inexperience, particularly in relation to the demanding cars that he was driving, regrettably caught up with him at the Belgian GP, where he made an error that resulted in his instantaneous death. It occurred at the same corner where even the normally infallible Moss had also crashed heavily in practice and it was only five laps after Bristow’s fatality that another British driver, Alan Stacey, was killed there too. Strangely, it was a crash between Stacey and Bristow that had eliminated the Bristow/Herrmann 718 from the 1959 TT pictured here.

    Of course, racing was a far more dangerous game in those days, even the drivers with the most experience and/or the greatest ability sometimes being caught out when the circumstances went against them. For instance, GP fatalities amounted to thirteen in the 1950’s, nine each in the 1960’s and 1970’s but by the 1980’s and 1990’s only two in each decade, so things did eventually improve.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5813

    Martin
    Keymaster

    With the Gitanes Matra and Martini Porsche transporters visible in the background, some of the competitors in the 1974 Brands Hatch 1000Km make their way out on to the track for practice. Just disappearing from view is the Porsche Cars GB 911 Carrera RSR (#9114609072) of Percy/Faure (Damaged engine/DNS) followed by the Martini 911 RSR Turbo (#9114609102R13) of Müller/van Lennep (Practiced 10th/Finished 5th), the obscured GELO 911 Carrera RSR (#9114609065) of Fitzpatrick/Hezemans/Schurti (P31st/F11th), the GELO 911 Carrera RSR (#unknown) of Hezemans/Schickentantz/Fitzpatrick (P28th/DNF) and we can just see the front wheel of the third GELO 911 Carrera RSR (#unknown) of Mezario/Schurti/Fitzpatrick (P29th/F13th).


    In this shot taken moments later all three of the GELO cars are visible and as will be noted from their driver line-up there was some swapping from car to car, although this was in part due to Fitzpatrick not getting a stint in the car that retired. The size of the rear wing of the RSR Turbo in comparison with the other cars is immediately apparent in the first picture, as its greater width at the rear.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5814

    Mike Beattie
    Participant

    Here are some photos from Phoenix Park in Dublin, take by my late friend Billy Patterson around the late 60s/early 70s

    The public roads inside the park were closed each year for races, originally the sportscar Irish Grand Prix in the 1920s & 30s and thereafter for races covering the wide spectrum I’m of racing machinery. The paddock was situated in the grassed areas inside the track.

    This shot is of John L’Amie’s 910, which he campaigned at several WEC events in Europe and Japan, partnered by Tommy Reid and Brian Nelson

     

    I don’t know any details if this 911, it may well be a UK car someone may recognise

     

    And finally a rather poor quality copy of a slide photo of Bill Bradley’s 906 ( I only had a very makeshift light box to take the photo from)

     

     

     

     

     

    • #5815

      Martin
      Keymaster

      An interesting threesome there, Mike. The 910 we’ve already covered in Porsche On-track>Circuits – Non-UK (although I didn’t know that it raced as far afield as Japan) and Bradley’s also much-travelled 906 (#144) looks to have been caught when it appeared in the Park in September 1968. It won what could to be a Formula Libre race (often the headline event) to judge by the other cars, some compensation for retiring in an FL race there the previous year when the suspension collapsed, no doubt a victim of the legendary bumpy surface of the track. It can also be seen in its earlier state, with those front winglets carried by many examples, in Porsche On-track>Circuits UK Post#5486 and its present owner, whose father bought it from Bradley, keeps threatening to get it back on to the circuits.

      The 911 (1969-71?) is more of a puzzle, RHD and looking pretty new. Are those rear wheelarches flared a little more than normal and is it my imagination or can I see one of those hoop-type roll bars that were commonly fitted to 911’s at that time? Is that something between the exhausts too? Even in 1972 Motor Sport called the circuit “a very exciting and extremely dangerous 2.77 miles” and by my reckoning eight layouts of differing lengths were used between 1929 and 2012. Many well-known cars and drivers competed there, even Caracciola who won his division of the International Irish GP in 1930 in a Mercedes SSK, the last car in which Dr Porsche had a hand before leaving that company. While much is stacked against its revival we can only hope that this circuit will rise again like its mythical namesake, even if only for sprints in the same way as Crystal Palace has done

  • #5817

    Mike Beattie
    Participant

    Martin

    a side in pic of the Bradley car showing a bit more detail. Billy  was only 14 when he took these photos and still working on his camera skills

     

     

     

     

    • #5819

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Any pictures from this era are welcome. This was presumably taken in practice, given the Mini and the Mustang in the background. Great stuff!

  • #5818

    Mike Beattie
    Participant

    Martin

    You are correct about the 910, it never made the Far East, put it down to my Senior Moment !

    Cheers

    Michael

  • #5849

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This 911 had trouble with its throttle cable during the 1969 Motor Show 200 at Brands Hatch, so that may be the problem that is being addressed here. The car, driven by Tone Hezemans, had come over from Holland and despite the pit stop still managed to record a 17th place.

    The meeting was the final round of the British Saloon Car Championship that year, 911’s being classed as touring cars in those days. The mechanic certainly looks as though he’s been doing some work!

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5857

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The Richard Lloyd Racing 924 Carrera GTR (#700006) is shown in its 1982 livery at the Canon-sponsored Tourist Trophy at Silverstone that year. Forming a display for Canon with the car below, this GTR had quite a competition career from 1981 to 1987, with some good class victories and some notable overall placings.

    The other half of the display was Richard Lloyd’s personal transport, this 924 Carrera GTS Clubsport (#710044). This was one of 15 GTS models made to Clubsport specification and is still on German export plates in this picture, although it later became GT100. These were very expensive in their day at three and a half times the price of a standard 924!

    These cars had a lightweight body (fiberglass panels and plexiglass windows), an aluminium roll cage, 935 seats and a 280bhp turbo engine, along with lots of other modifications to give them a top speed of over 150mph. Shown above without its advertising and when parked outside the Silverstone premises of GTi Engineering, the car wears another of its registrations.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5868

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Although qualifying on pole and setting the fastest race lap at the 1979 Silverstone Six Hours, this 936 (#001) of Brian Redman/Jochen Mass failed to finish due to an accident. The number of laps that it had covered prior to this nominally placed it 10th and here during practice Redman gives a ride to a photographer!

    While this scene is basically similar today there are lots of detail changes, such as the protective fencing with signalling gaps running the length of the pit wall (which makes photography from there a lot more difficult). Around the time of our picture I recall operating the hooter warning that a car was about to enter the pit road. This was done by pressing a small, spring-loaded doorbell(!) switch mounted on the Esso sign in the background. It was a simple system which worked remarkably well, although with the noise from the cars on the track only feet away it was often impossible to know if the klaxon was actually sounding.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

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