Competition

This topic contains 45 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Martin 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #3821

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Jochen Mass is very much one of our Porsche People, having raced many Porsches during the 1970’s and 1980’s. Although a Rothmans Porsche driver on many occasions he also had a F1 career from 1973-82 and in that final year drove a Rothmans-sponsored March 821, hence his being pictured here talking to Adrian Reynard, the March chief engineer that season. Mass decided to leave GP racing after an accident during that year and from then on devoted himself solely to closed-wheel cars with great success.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #3826

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Looking quietly confident, this is the Richard Lloyd Racing team at Le Mans in 1985 with drivers Weaver, Lloyd and Palmer and their 956 (#106B). Team principle Lloyd began his association with Porsche when using a 924GTR for the 1981 season. The car was sponsored by Canon and this proved to be a successful and lasting association, being carried forward when his GTi Engineering team moved up to running a 956. James Weaver had numerous 956 and 962 drives during a varied career, spending much of it with American team Dyson Racing. Dr Jonathan Palmer enjoyed an F1 career as well as racing sports cars and saloons before pursuing business activities that have led to him heading Motor Sport Vision, who control a number of British circuits. Of the three only Lloyd is no longer with us, due to being a passenger in a fatal light aircraft crash.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    The original Lloyd #106 had been crashed and while some components were rebuilt by Lloyd into the car that we see here some others also formed the basis of a rebuilt #106 after they were sold to Walter Brun, hence the ‘B’ of the Lloyd car. This is just the sort of thing that has always happened with racing cars, much to the confusion of historians and it certainly makes some 917’s rather difficult to pin down for the same reason! Anyway, the confidence of the team was rewarded on this occasion as they finished 2nd from a grid 9th, only three laps behind the winning Joest 956B and four laps ahead of the first of works 962’s, a very worthwhile result for these British privateers.

  • #4331

    Martin
    Keymaster

    I think that it is always good to put faces to the names of famous drivers as not everyone knows what they looked like and on this occasion I am pleased to be able to include this impromptu portrait of Jo Siffert, taken at Daytona in 1970 or 1971 where he was sharing a JW-Gulf 917.

    Born in Switzerland, he began like many others by racing motorcycles and was Swiss 350cc champion in 1959 when he was 23 and shortly after he switched to cars. Entering GP racing as a privateer during the early 1960s and continuing to race in F1 throughout the decade -usually with smaller private teams- he graduated to March and BRM works drives in 1970 and 1971. In parallel with his F1 career he began racing Porsches in the mid-1960s and was soon taken on as a factory driver, competing in a wide range of models throughout the world with great success.

    This is a marvellous portrait of him in a reflective mood when on the grid prior to the 1967 BOAC 500 at Brands Hatch. Partnered -unusually- by Bruce McLaren, the 910 (#028) had qualified 8th and finished 3rd, the first Porsche home but two laps behind the other cars. It was at Brands Hatch four years later that he was to lose his life in a GP BRM after a component broke due to contact with another car earlier in the race. He was only 35 and a JW 917 led his funeral procession back home in Switzerland.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by  Martin.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by  Martin.
    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by  Martin. Reason: Additinal picture
  • #4925

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Another Swiss driver who was often found behind the wheel of Porsches was Herbert Muller, here seen in the  917/30 (#001) of the Swiss Martini Racing Team at the 1974 Martini International Super Sports race at Silverstone. This was the opening round of the Interserie Championship and although starting from pole he had to give best to the 917/10 of Willie Kauhsen by just under 12 seconds.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    Having escaped a massive and fiery accident in a Ferrari (the other make he raced a lot) at the Nurburgring in 1972, it was another crash there that claimed his life in 1981. During the 1000Km meeting the 908/3 (#013) that he was sharing with owner Siegfried Brunn left the track -possibly due to avoiding or being distracted by a spinning car- and hit the abandoned 935 (#00900016) of Rahal/Akin. Given the inherently dangerous nature of the circuit, quite why the 935 had been left in such prone position after colliding with another car on lap one until Muller hit it on lap 13 (of what was to have been a 44 lap race) is not clear. Having completed next to no distance the 935 was fully fuelled and so a massive fire ensued, although the fact that Muller was unaccountably not belted in sealed his fate.

    Muller had ostensibly retired from racing at the end of 1979 but would occasionally still return to the track, three times in 1980 and on this final occasion in 1981. He was allegedly going to give up racing for good after this event, but who can say? He is one of a select number of racing drivers commemorated by a public place, Herbert Muller Platz in Reinach, Switzerland.

  • #4926

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Jackie Oliver had a short but productive association with Porsche, beginning racing in his 850 Mini road car in the early 1960s until his father bought him a Marcos. From this he worked his way up the sports car racing ladder, eventually driving GT40s and Mirages for JWAE. By 1969 he was also racing in Can-Am and he made his Grand Prix debut the following year.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    1971 saw him taking a place in the Gulf-Porsche team and although he only stayed with the 917s for six months he scored some notable results. Unfortunately the desire to pursue his Can-Am and GP interests and his dislike of being the number two to Pedro Rodriguez caused him to walk away from the team half way through the season despite his success with them. Thereafter he has enjoyed a long motorsport career as a driver and ultimately an F1 team owner and he can still be seen taking part in historic racing today.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by  Martin.
  • #4927

    Martin
    Keymaster

    ^Huschke von Hanstein (1911-1996) is seen here at Aintree for the 1961 British GP with the 718/2 (#03) of Bonnier, which finished 5th in terrible conditions after qualifying 3rd.  The other 718/2 of Gurney (#04) can just be glimpsed and note Hanstein’s cine camera on the pit wall and the two less than happy-looking Porsche mechanics, both smoking! Hanstein was so often pictured with a camera of some sort.


    Von Hanstein -or to give him his full title Fritz Sittig Enno Werner von Hanstein- came from a German family of some nobility, although WW2 resulted in their losing everything due to the subsequent partitioning of the country. He joined Porsche in the early days of the company and stayed with them for over 20 very active years, becoming their racing manager, PR head and international representative during the 1950’s and 1960’s and he remained something of a Porsche ambassador even after leaving.

    See here with Hans Herrmann when tyre testing at Hockenheim at the end of the 1959 season, he began motorcycle racing in 1929, competed at Le Mans in an Adler in 1937 and won the Mille Miglia for BMW in 1940. Post-war he raced various German cars until his first Porsche outing in 1952. For the next 15 years he could be seen racing Porsches all over the world in addition to his other duties within the company, often partnering the well-known drivers of the day. His main outings were in the 550 and 718, but he also raced 356, 904, 907 and 911 models.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4937

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Jurgen Barth (in the red overalls) definitely qualifies for inclusion within this category. The son of famed Porsche racer Edgar, he has spent his working life at Porsche as an engineer, a rally and race driver and he has also written one of the most comprehensive books on the marque. Now 70, he joined Porsche as a 16 year old apprentice in 1963 but had been born in East Germany and lived there until the family fled to West Germany when he was ten.

    With his father a works Porsche driver until his early death from cancer in 1965, the young Barth was moving in the inner circle of motor racing and Porsche in particular from an early age and after graduating with the company he continued to work for them. He was fortunate that Porsche became more customer oriented in respect of competition cars in the early 1970’s and so found his niche in that area, although he also began competitive driving -initially rallying- in Porsches at 21. This he continued to do on the circuits and the special stages to good effect and perhaps one of his greatest triumphs was being part of the winning 936 team at Le Mans in 1977.

    Here he is on the 1983 Monte Carlo Rally with navigator -and fellow Porsche employee- Roland Kussmaul. Looking very cool beside their 911SC, they finished 11th.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by  Martin.
  • #4938

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The JW-Gulf mechanics certainly look to have been earning their keep in this picture, taken at the end of the 1971 Daytona 24 Hours. In fact, after almost twenty hours of the race had elapsed the leading 917 had pitted with the gearbox jammed in fourth, something which took about ninety minutes to sort out. Due to its massive lead prior to the problem the car, in the hands of Rodriguez/Oliver, rejoined only a few laps behind the new leader and still went on to win the race.

    The chap in the light blue cap (enjoying a Pepsi and a cigarette) is Ermanno Cuoghi, by this time already regarded as one of the top race mechanics in the world. Coming to JW during their GT40 period he next joined Ferrari and spent seven years there, becoming the personal mechanic to Nikki Lauda. He was a famous enough figure by 1980 to have his story told in a book and another about him (he is now 82) was published in Italy during 2017.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5029

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Seen in front of the JW Automotive transporter and what we’re sure is David Piper’s 917 while filming Le Mans on location, Steve McQueen was also a driver of some ability and almost won the 1970 Sebring 12 Hours in a 908 when partnering Peter Revson. Two of the children may well be his son Chad and daughter Terry. Years earlier and while filming in Britain in 1961 he got to know his idol Stirling Moss and this resulted in his racing Sir John Whitmore’s Mini at Brands Hatch, where he came third in class behind Vic Elford and Christabel Carlisle, now Lady Watson but in those days a successful Mini racer.

    Looking to have been taken in the pits during practice for the Sebring race mentioned above, McQueen looks rather thoughtful (no, he’s not smoking!) as the Solar Productions 908/02 (#022) is being refuelled. The car qualified 15th but finished 2nd overall and 1st in class and three months later it had been repainted dark blue and was completing at Le Mans while acting as a camera car for his Le Mans feature film. Note the special mounting to raise the mirror.

    That certainly looks to be son Chad in blue on the left of the picture below. McQueen dove his stints with his left foot in a cast due to a recent motorcycling accident. He had to have asbestos insulation wrapped around the plaster and coincidentally the cancer that was to kill him ten years later was asbestos-related, although it is thought to have been caused by his other exposures to the material.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5128

    Hartwig Rietz
    Participant

    Certainly one of the most famous Porsche People is Vic Elford. Here he is, a familiar look to those dinosaurs following racing for a certain while now. The picture is taken from a Gulf promo brochure from 1971, which included a set of slides(!).Vic Elford / Photo: Gulf

  • #5147

    Martin
    Keymaster

    I think that we should not overlook the many ‘Porsche Ladies’ and although Patsy Burt only had one season of Porsche involvement in a competition career that ran from 1949 to 1970, I think that year makes her worthy of inclusion here. We’ll come to that in a moment, but first a brief résumé of her motoring activities up to that point.

    Born in 1948 into a motor sport background, she first tried driving tests and rallying but after a few years discovered that speed events were what she really enjoyed. By the middle Fifties she was competing in these in an Aston Martin and she scored her first major sprinting success in 1956 when she won the Ladies Award at the Brighton Speed Trials. This was in a Connaught GP car which was loaned to her by Rob Walker, best known as an entrant of Stirling Moss (including his season in an F2 Porsche 718).

    Interspersed with the speed events there were still some surprising and ambitious outings, such as the Nurburgring 1000Km in an MGA with Jean Bloxham in 1957 or international rallying with works teams, including the Ladies Award on the 1959 RAC Rally in an Anglia with Anne Hall. 1959 was also an important year for her in hill-climbing as she contested the RAC National Championship in a Cooper T43 and came fourth overall to three of the biggest names of the day, breaking one course record.

    For 1960 she did something that few British drivers have ever done and took part in some European Hillclimb Championship events and in 1961 she returned to contest the whole Championship with a Porsche, the 718RSK shown in action in the picture above. I’m not sure that any other British driver -male or female- has ever taken on this series and she did remarkably well until an accident caused by a sticking throttle brought things to a premature end. These continental meetings are held over closed public roads and run to many miles rather than yards as in Britain, so their challenging nature for someone use to short British venues cannot be overstated. Despite this Patsy took twelve ladies records abroad and as well as holding numerous national and international records was a class-winner on over 170 occasions!

    After further British and continental experiences in a Cooper T59 she found her final racing car in 1966 via her acquaintance Bruce McLaren, when he built her an M3A powered by a 4.4L, 360bhp Oldsmobile V8. She used this car until her retirement in 1970 and scored some notable victories with it, including being RAC Sprint Champion in that final year (the first time a woman had been a national motorsport champion) and setting a new course record at Brighton in 1968 which stood until 1975. Her Ladies record at Shelsley Walsh also endured from 1967 to 1978.

    Although much of the foregoing is non-Porsche I feel that it presents a fuller picture of this remarkable racing driver, whose cars were always immaculately turned out in that special shade known as Burt Blue and white as seen above. She even specified this blue on a new Ferrari road car. With her business partner and later husband Ron Smith she was also responsible for inventing those beam-breaking timing struts found on every speed event car and she died in 2001 at 73, meriting an obituary in The Daily Telegraph.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive.

  • #5168

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Smartly turned out as ever, Graham Hill stands in front of the 718 RS60 (#041) which came second in the 1960 Nurburgring 1000Km. He was entered to drive this car but in the event he shared another works RS60 with Barth, although they failed to finish. Note too the factory Abarth Carrera GTL (#1001) in the background, the car which Hill was to drive to a class win in the Tourist Trophy at Goodwood a few months later.

    Although more associated with British makes such as Lotus (but also with Ferrari), Hill was certainly no stranger to Porsche, having a number of factory drives in sports cars and single-seaters from the early to the middle 1960’s. These were often in the most demanding of races, such as those at Sebring, the Nurburgring and in the Targa Florio and where -mechanical problems not intervening- he usually acquitted himself in a very satisfactory fashion. He is seen below in a 718/2 (#03) at the 1960 Solitude F2 GP where he finished 4th, John Surtees having a rare Porsche outing in this race in the Rob Walker/Stirling Moss car.

    Hill was in many ways among the earliest of sportsmen to take their fame on the tracks into the wider public arena. I remember him appearing on the popular TV panel game Call My Bluff and also playing himself in John Frankenheimer’s film Grand Prix, although playing as opposed to being yourself looked to be a lot more difficult! I also recall him opening my local Ford dealer during the 1960’s, arriving for the occasion in an orange road-registered GT40 which I stood behind as it radiated a massive amount of heat after its no doubt spirited run down to Wales.

    Hill remains the only driver to have won Indianapolis, Le Mans and the F1 World Championship and in these times of drivers confining themselves to one motorsport discipline this record may stand for some time yet.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5176

    Hartwig Rietz
    Participant

    There´s a shot of Jo Siffert on this forum already, one of the heroes of the great days of sportscar racing, no doubt. Inside the JW Team he had a fierce opponent, the Mexican driver Pedro Rodriguez. As quick and as determined as Jo Siffert he was one of the few capable of taking the 917 to the limit.

    Here´s Mr. Rodriguez. It´s another picture of the aforementioned Gulf promo series of slides, taken at Monza in 1971.Pedro Rodriguez Monza 1971

  • #5178

    Martin
    Keymaster

    That’s a great portrait Pedro and here are a couple of others.  He is seen smartly turned out when accompanied by s his mother (and is that his sister?) while taking it easy on the pit counter at the 1969 Nurburgring 1000KM. Like many drivers of that era he was quite an all-rounder and while primarily remembered as a sports car racer he also competed in Formula 1 from 1963 to 1971 in a variety of makes and models.

    Although strongly associated with the 917 he only raced Porsches for the two seasons leading up to his death in 1971, having consistently raced Ferraris from 1957 and it was in one of those in which the Mexican died aged only 31. He also raced twice for Porsche at Le Mans but retired on both occasions, although he had previously won the race in a Ford GT40.

    Here he is at the 1970 Monza 1000Km, nonchalantly lounging on the 917 (#016) in which he won the race with Leo Kinnunen from a grid 5th, beating the Matra MS650 visible in the background among others. He was an outstanding driver even in the wet and the simple but effective appearance of the Gulf race suits can also be seen here.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Martin.
  • #5182

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This looks to be Bjorn Waldegard in this 911 and noting the frontal protection and makeshift ventilation  I think that the picture might be from 1978 when he finished 4th on the East African Safari Rally. It was a Porsche that gave him his first big rally victory -a 911 on the 1969 Monte- and he enjoyed a thirty year career on the stages beginning in 1962.

    There were some notable Porsche performance among his successful drives for many of the most competitive manufacturers and in parallel with this he also took part in the European Rallycross Championship in a Carrera RS for a few years during the 1970’s. Perhaps his most unusual outing is shown below, partnering Richard Attwood in a works 908/3 in the 1970 Targa Florio, where they finished 5th from a grid 10th. That looks to be David Yorke talking to Vic Elford in the background but does anyone know who that is standing on Waldegard’s left?

    He repeated his Monte Carlo victory in 1970 with this rare 911S/T, a car that Jurgen Barth subsequently used to compile pace notes for the icy 1972 event.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5212

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Usually easily identified by the distinctive checkered band on his helmet (later adopted by his admirer Innes Ireland), Jean Behra will crop up throughout PPP. The picture of him below was probably one of the last taken (in the dark top), in the AVUS paddock prior to the 1959 German GP sports car support race. He is leaning on his 718RSK (#030) and was also due to drive his F2 Bhera-Porsche the following day.

    Like many car racers he started competing on motorcycles, turning to four wheels in 1950 when he was 29. Although he graduated to GP racing in 1951 and achieved some good results in a variety of makes, he only ever managed wins in non-championship events. Beginning in sports cars with Gordini he had much better luck after switching to Maserati and he was seen behind the wheel of Porsches from 1956, getting factory drives from 1958. A period with Ferrari sports and single-seaters for the 1959 season was ended by an altercation with their team manager and that year also saw the appearance of his own F2 Bhera-Porsche (see our Partially Porsche setion).

    He is seen above in a be-finned works 718RSK, which he shared with Edgar Barth in the 1958 Nurburgring 1000Km until retiring at half distance. His death on the damp and steep AVUS banking just over a year later robbed the sport of a popular and talented driver who was still only 38 years old.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5307

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The 1962 Aintree 200 was another of the many non-championship GP’s that took place during this period. Shown is German Wolfgang Siedel in Carel de Beaufort’s other 718/2 (#01), which he entered five times that year as Autosport Team Wolfgang Siedel until replacing it later in the season with a Lotus 24-BRM. Here he only qualified 14th out of 23 starters and his luck did not improve in the race, the car retiring with differential failure after only ten of the fifty laps.

    As well as the usual also-rans this race included a higher proportion of top drivers than did many of this type, perhaps because so many were British or were based here, yet some of the second division names finished surprisingly well-placed. This car was repaired after Carel’s fatal accident in it two years later and is on display at a Dutch museum, although I believe that it is still in the ownership of the de B family. It was great to see it on static display at the 2018 Goodwood Festival of Speed, its cockpit in remarkably original order.

    Returning to Siedel, he was more commonly seen in Porsche sports cars -his single-seater outings in various makes were sporadic and largely unsuccessful- and he began racing in 1951, his first Porsche entry being with a 356 in 1954. Some of his Porsche drives were in works cars -partnering Barth he won the Targa Florio for them in 1959- but the majority were as a privateer and he also raced various other makes, particularly Ferrari. His racing career came to an end after an acrimonious public falling-out with the Automobilclub von Deutschland and he carried on running his garage in Dusseldorf until killed by a heart attack in 1987. He was 60 years old.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5381

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Two shots of some well-known Porsche personalities, taken in the Goodwood pits at the 1958 RAC TT. In the first we see an unidentified couple on the left -both wearing expressions worthy of a caption competition!- then Huschke von Hanstein talking to Jean Behra and Carel de Beaufort next to what I think is Carel’s sister/team manager Cornelie, who is also seen in the shot below. As ever, Hanstein has his still and movie cameras at the ready on the counter, presumably having taken them from the briefcase on the left next to a helmet and goggles.

    In the second picture Edgar Barth stands between the two factory entries, a 718RSK on the left that he shared with Behra and a 550RS on the right that was used by de Beaufort and Christian Heins, the Brazilian driver who was killed in an Alpine at Le Mans in 1963 and highly regarded in his day, although little remembered now. In the event the 550 finished 8th and the 718 a class winning 4th and note the sign which states ‘Sitting On Pit Counters Forbidden’ and more unusually ‘Do Not Throw Litter On Pit Road’!

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5394

    Martin
    Keymaster

    YOU 4 is a famous registration number and was to be found on a number of cars belonging to that great Porsche enthusiast Dickie Stoop (and incidentally, Beatle and car enthusiast George Harrison had the number YOU 5 on some of his Porsches).

    Photo: AFN Archive

    Stoop was born in 1920 and saw RAF service during WW2. Not only was he a pilot but he was stationed at Westhampnett, the airfield that subsequently became the Goodwood circuit and as a boy he knew Douglas Bader, who was a family friend. He stayed in the RAF post-war, but when he found that it was interfering with his racing interests he resigned(!), having sufficient private means to do so.

    He began racing in 1948 and while this led to drives in many makes he developed a close friendship with Aldington of the Frazer Nash manufacturer and British Porsche importer AFN.  Logically, this meant that in 1960 he made the same transition from Frazer Nash to Porsche as AFN had itself already done. Initially racing two 356B Carreras very widely (the other was 5 HOT), this one is seen at Snetterton in June 1961 where it finished 4th behind three out-and-out racing cars. Also competing at foreign circuits and hill climbs, he graduated to a 904 for the 1964 season, apparently the first one imported into Britain. He also competed at Le Mans on numerous occasions, once sharing Carel de Beaufort’s 718 RS60, although they failed to finish.

    His 904 (#045) is seen getting a bit out of shape during the GT race supporting the 1964 European/British GP at Brands Hatch and then having something of an off-course excursion. He still brought it home 8th from a grid 9th, although only 4th in class behind three Elans.

    This Irish Green car happily still exists and is seen regularly.

    When the 911 came along he purchased one, which we see in the Castle Combe paddock in 1968. Note the rather rudimentary roll bar, as found in many racing 911’s during this period.

    It was regrettably at the wheel of this silver 911S that he was to die soon after the paddock shot, when he suffered a heart attack during the third lap of a club race at the Croft circuit in May 1968. The car hit a bank and rolled due to this, an untimely end at only 47 for such an enthusiastic flyer and driver.

    Ted heard recently that this car apparently still exists and is being rebuilt, although from the above it looks as though such a project would involve some serious work. It would be interesting to learn where the car has been during the intervening period.

    Other Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5419

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Member Peter Settle has kindly passed on this obituary from the a 1968 BARC Yorkshire Centre magazine.

    • #5468

      Martin
      Keymaster

      PPP member Peter Settle has been on the trail of Dickie’s 356 Carrera 2 GS (#125108?). He thinks that Dickie probably sold it when he acquired his 904 in 1964 and has discovered that the car passed into the ownership of Jim Hall, an executive for the Lombard finance company who had an office in Bradford. Jim was a keen club racer in the North of England up to around 1970 and Peter is in touch with a friend who took pictures at those events, so we may yet get to see a photo of the car during this period.

      With his various personal registration numbers perhaps we should have a quick recap on them and their status today:

      YOU 4 – Today seen on the ex-DS 904 but still registered to a red 1967 911 2.7, untaxed since February 1993. Chris Maltin had the number on a 911T, so perhaps he still has it and this number stashed away. Simon Drabble, via member Robert Barrie, reminds us that Stoop also had this number on a Lotus Elite in 1959, when he entered it for two British drivers at Le Mans while himself driving a works Triumph.

      5 HOT – Today registered to a roadworthy yellow 1974 911 3.0.

      OU 4 – Used on Dickie’s BMW tow car and today on a 2011 Honda.

      4  YOU – Sometimes quoted as a DS registration, but perhaps mistakenly instead of YOU 4. Today on a 2009 Mercedes.

      HOT 5 – Again, perhaps mistakenly attributed instead of 5 HOT and not recorded as existing today.

       

      • This reply was modified 7 months, 2 weeks ago by  Martin.
    • #5473

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Re: the above, for the sake of completeness we should also include a couple of Dickie’s other Porsches:

      DAA 911C – On Dickie’s first 911 but no longer recorded, although the car was still being raced carrying his number in the mid-1970’s.

      MAA 911F – On Dickie’s 911L Sportomatic road car. Allocated to a replica Carrera RS race car for over 25 years, although as that car is said to be based on a 1967/8 911T the Sportomatic may still exist under another number.

    • #5713

      Martin
      Keymaster

      MAA 911F – Member David O’Connor has established that the car carrying this registration has the same chassis number as the Stoop Sportomatic and so they appear to be one and the same after all.

      Many thanks for this information, Dave.

    • #5501

      robert barrie
      Participant

      Hi there, what an interesting site and series of threads. Can I ask if we think the two 911s shown with the registration YOU 4 are the same car? There are some differences in the pictures that make me wonder – do you have any more details of the cars? Many thanks, Robert

    • #5502

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Good to have you with us, Robert.

      As far as I am aware they are the same car, especially as the year before Dickie was racing another (green) 911, DAA 911C, but it’s a point worth exploring. The only differences that I can spot are the addition of an OS mirror, the replacement of the number plate with a self-adhesive type and the removal of the fog lamps. It is possible that these were transferred to Dickie’s 911L Sportomatic road car as that had a pair of these lamps in the usual position in addition to a pair of conventional round spots in front of the horn grilles. For some reason the wipers are not in the parked position in the Castle Combe shot.

      Although it is rather beyond our remit here, Dickie had such a fascinating career outside his Porsche involvements, racing at Le Mans on ten occasions in Frazer Nash (6), AC (1), Triumph (1), Austin-Healey (1) and also sharing Carel de Beaufort’s 718 in 1960, scoring four finishes from these starts. He also took part in other long-distance events such as the Spa 24H and raced at the Nurburgring in cars as diverse as a lightweight E-Type and a Mini!

      Member Steve Wagg has also been in touch to reveal that he was working with Griff Griffiths when Dickie’s former 356 Carrera 5 HOT was was delivered to them in a damaged state and that its engine was then fitted into Griff’s well-known Autocavan rallycross VW Beetle. No wonder that car was so fast! Thanks Steve.

    • #5504

      robert barrie
      Participant

      Many thanks Martin. They may indeed be the same car, but there has been some development between the two photographs. Do you have the dates? The thing that made me wonder was the wipers. The Castle Combe positioning – ie parked on the passenger side – is correct for a 67 model year car. The other picture – is it also Croft? – has them parked in the 68 model year position, but they are still silver, which is the correct colour for a 67 model year car! Lovely pictures anyway and a sad ending

    • #5505

      Martin
      Keymaster

      If the Castle Combe shot was indeed taken in 1968 (as stated on the print) then it could not have been that long (perhaps a couple of months?) before the fatal accident on May 19th, although it does look as though it might  have been taken during a test session rather than at a meeting given the lack of race numbers and paddock activity.  Regarding the wipers, didn’t these only switch to NS parking on the LHD cars for 1968? For instance, Dickie’s RHD 1968 model 911 Sportomatic had matt black wipers but they still parked on the OS.

      Perhaps the 911 was at Castle Combe testing due to the circuit being leased by AFN from late 1963 to 1975 and Dickie having a very close relationship with the company. Looking back it seems incredibly far-sighted that in 1971 Porsche Cars GB, which had been formed out of AFN’s importing concession in 1965 with Porsche KG taking a stake in both businesses, had plans to build offices and a storage facility in the CC paddock and use the circuit as a test track while still allowing a five race meetings per year.

      Fortunately (at least for the future of the circuit as a racing venue) these plans were quashed by the Wiltshire County Council planning committee, but the germ of the idea that led to the establishment of the Porsche Experience Centre at Silverstone in 2008 can be seen in this. The circuit was sub-let by AFN to John Webbs’s MCD (Motor Circuit Developments) from 1969 to 1971, the company that ran Mallory Park, Oulton Park, Snetterton and Brands Hatch, but by 1975 AFN -and particularly John Aldington- were glad to divest themselves of it when Howard Strawford formed a company to run the track. AFN could see no future in the place but Strawford continued to head and develop CC until his death in 2013 and the circuit flourishes to this day.

    • #5658

      Martin
      Keymaster

      From well-known hill climber Tony Bancroft via member Peter Settle we learn something more of the damaged 5 HOT, as mentioned in Post#5502 above. Tony is able to confirm that Jim Hall (Post#5468 above) raced and hill climbed the car at Harewood, Scarborough, Croft and Rufforth, having previously competed in a white 356 Super 90 for a few years prior to acquiring the ex-Stoop car. Tony has provided some details of Jim’s appearances in the Carrera during 1966-1968 and he consistently scored wins and other good places with the car.

      Tony was present -although he cannot remember where, but possibly at Rufforth- when Jim was pushed off(!) by well-known Yorkshire Porsche racer Tony Dean, who competed nationally and internationally for almost thirty years from 1963, including in Can-Am with a 908 between 1969 and 1972. On the occasion in question Dean was using his ex-works Ferrari Dino 206S and as a consequence of their contact the Carrera rolled, which almost certainly explains its condition mentioned in Post#5502.

      Tony has kindly provided this 1970 BARC Yorkshire Circular cover and 5 HOT can be seen on the right of the grid at Croft in March 1968, Dean and others out of sight ahead of him. The 911 Fuchs’ wheels and the modified rear wheel arches of the 356 will be noted and that looks to be another 356 on the back row. Apart from those of light-coloured  356’s of Edgar Wadsworth there was another Carrera active in Yorkshire during the 1960’s, the Carrera 2 of Chippy Stross that was registered SUB 333 (today on a BMW), so it just might be him.

      Jim survived his crash and apparently moved to Majorca in the 1980’s. Many thanks to Tony and Peter for filling in more of the history of this car.

      Photo: BARC via Tony Bancroft

    • #5690

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Again thanks to Tony Bancroft via Peter Settle we are able to see an earlier image of 5 HOT in Jim Hall’s ownership. Taken from a Harewood hill climb programme, Tony thinks that this depicts the first outing for Jim in the car on June 25th 1966, when he won his class. The Carrera looks to be in much the same order as when in Dickie’s ownership and rather different to its appearance in Post#5658 above, a picture that Peter thinks was taken on March 24th 1968 when it came 4th overall and 2nd in class.

      We now also have a shot of the 356 that Jim Hall used prior to acquiring 5 HOT, which can be seen in Post#5691 in Speed Events – UK.

      Photo: BARC via Tony Bancroft

    • #5714

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Again our thanks go to to Tony Bancroft for searching through his old motoring magazines to come up with this advert for 5 HOT, which appeared in Autosport on May 13th 1966. It is interesting for the fact that it shows how few miles the car had covered and for the claim that it was the only RHD Carrera 2, along with a reference to Stoop having been indisposed for two years. He kept the car after buying his 904 for the 1964 season yet he barely raced during 1965 and 1966, so did his indisposition during this period relate to the heart problem which ultimately caused his fatal crash? It has been said that this was a longstanding condition.

      From the preceding post we can see that Jim Hall was using the car just over a month after it was advertised and given its low mileage at the time it changed hands this may still have been relatively low when it was written off at Rufforth only two years later.

      Photo: Autosport via Tony Bancroft and with thanks to Peter Settle

    • #5728

      Martin
      Keymaster

      We now have another picture of Dickie’s first 356 Carrera (YOU 4, as seen in Post #5394 above) but in later ownership -along with a bit more DS information- in Circuits – UK Post#5723.

  • #5410

    Martin
    Keymaster

    John Wyer, erroneously thought by many to be the JW in the JWAE Gulf-Porsche team due to his public profile, had a considerable history in motor racing team management prior to his Porsche involvement. He had long headed the Aston-Martin works competition programme (and overseen his first Le Mans victory with them) prior to joining Ford’s Advanced Vehicle Operations division. When this department closed only a few years later he founded JWA with Ford dealer John Willment (the real JW and also the brother-in-law of Hans Herrmann), taking over the production of the GT40 on behalf of Ford.

    In tandem with this JW produced the first of their Ford-powered Mirage sports racing cars with the backing of Gulf Oil and this sponsorship continued when JW took over the responsibility for running the Porsche works team for two years. Below he is seen at the end of the 1970 Targa Florio as winners Siffert and Redman enjoy the Cinzano (none of that French stiff here in Italy, thank you), his expression implying that they hadn’t just scored a convincing 1-2 victory. Perhaps he was just annoyed that the third car had only come in 5th?

    JW returned to producing and running Mirages after this Porsche interlude, eventually becoming Gulf Research Racing and winning Le Mans with one in the hands of Bell/Ickx in1975 before Gulf withdrew from motor sport. By that time Wyer had effectively handed over to his very long-time associated John Horsman and he retired to Arizona for the benefit of his asthma, although smoking the small cigars with which he is sometimes pictured cannot have helped this condition. He cultivated a particularly severe manner, made comments in line with this and was rarely pictured smiling (as above), but he certainly produced results.

    On what looks to be a relaxed day in Sicily at the Targa Florio (well, there was a wait of over thirty minutes for a car to come around!) we see Wyer alongside his racing manager David Yorke with stop watches and notebooks in hand while others just look on. During his time with the JW team Yorke was regarded as something of an enigmatic figure, with little disclosed about his personal circumstances. However, he was an excellent organiser before and during races and could always be seen supervising pit stops, as he is for this 917 (#029/014) at the Watkins Glen Six Hours in 1971. He stands in front of the car and is in turn being watched by chief mechanic Ermamno Coughi, while Wyer can be seen through the refuelling rig.

    As was the way in those times, the person wearing sandals and shorts during refuelling will be noted, as will the large piece of foam on the shoulder of the refueller. Having become involved in motor racing management at a similar time to Wyer, Yorke had something of a hiatus between running the Vanwall grand prix team and joining JW, subsequently becoming responsible for Martini’s motor sport involvements, after which he too retired.

  • #5427

    Martin
    Keymaster

    I think that Desiré Wilson certainly deserves to be one of our Porsche People, not only on the basis of being one of the few female drivers to race a 935 on a number of occasions but also due to having raced the 956, 962 and once even a 908/3 turbo. She was racing by the age of 12(!) and her career covered many formulae right up to CART, World Championship Sports Cars and Formula 1. She is pictured here in her home country in 1981 at Kyalami, where she was driving for the Tyrrell team in the South African GP.

    She has recorded many strong finishes throughout her career and holds a number of ‘first woman’ records, in some cases being the only woman to realise certain achievements in motor sport. She has competed at Le Mans three times -once as part of an all-female team- but below we see the occasion of her best outing. Sharing this Obermaier 956 (#109) with Jurgen Lassig and Axel Plankenhorn in the 1983 race she finished 7th from a grid 12th, a result bettered or equalled by only three other ladies out of the 59 women to have competed there since the race began in 1923.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5431

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Wolverhampton-born Richard Attwood’s involvement with the Porsche company continues to the present day after beginning with a works trial in 1968. This led to him joining the factory team for 1969 and prior to this he had raced a variety of cars in various formulae up to F1 after starting in motor sport in 1960. Of course, he is best remembered for giving Porsche their first Le Mans outright win in 1970, although not so well recalled as having almost won again the following year when his JW 917 was two laps down in second place.

    After many works and some private Porsche outings in the 1969-71 period he effectively retired, although he raced a 944 in the PCGB championship in the 1980’s and in 1984 had a rare Brumos 928 outing in the Daytona 24 Hours, finishing 15th. That year also saw him briefly return to top line competition with a couple of drives (including Le Mans) in a Nimrod-Aston Martin and well over thirty years after his American 928 outing he was to be found once again competing in that model, this time in British historic racing.

    The Attwood/Herrmann 917K (#020) of Porsche Salzburg is seen above on its way to a fine 3rd from a grid 12th in the very wet conditions at Brands Hatch during the 1970 BOAC 1000. Two months later it was used by the pair (along with Spoerry and Steinemann) as at T-car at Le Mans, where Attwood actually recorded a slightly faster practice time in it than #023 that he and Herrmann took to victory, #023 having finished 2nd at Brands in the hands of Elford/Hulme.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5523

    Martin
    Keymaster

    British actress Jacqueline Evans might not be seen as the first choice for one of our Porsche People, but although not prolific in her racing endeavours she merits inclusion -in much the same way as fellow Briton Patsy Burt- for the arena in which her Porsche competition took place. Born in London in 1915 (her real Christian names were Grace Alice) she was already playing small parts in British films when she went to New York in 1946 and then on to Mexico. It was there that she met Fernando Lopez, apparently (and somehow almost inevitably!) a bullfighter and their subsequent marriage meant that what had been a holiday visit led to her remaining in Mexico for the rest of her life.

    Prior to the start of the 1953 race, with what was to be her 1954 entry behind.

    Photo: Unknown

    She took part in all five runnings of the Carrera Panamericana road race, an event perhaps even more dangerous than the Targa Florio or the Mille Miglia. Unlike some other entrants she always drove solo, her first three outings in Chryslers netting her two finishes, but she is particularly remembered for driving a 356 in the 1953 race. The bonnet of the car was adorned with a portrait of Eva Peron, who had died the previous year and as the wife of the Argentinian president had championed women’s rights. The car was also adorned with the slogans ‘In Memory of Eva Peron’ and ‘Representing the Women of the World’, but unfortunately it was disqualified after exceeding the time limit.

    Her 1953 entry.

    Photo: Porsche AG

    The following year she took part in a Porsche again, this time in the super light 356SL (#356-2/054) that should have raced alongside its class-winning team-mate at Le Mans in 1951 (the first Porsche participation in the race) but had been unable to do so due to a night-time practice accident. This car had been built using one of the Gmund aluminium bodies but with fared-in wheels and had also run as a Urugyayun entry (see first picture above) in the previous Carrera, a 1.5L engine having replaced its original 1.1L unit shortly after LM. Running in Mexico on both occasions without its wheel spats and with its body differing in detail to its LM appearance after its post-accident rebuild by Porsche, Evans again ran out of time and so was eliminated.

    Her 1954 entry, with another 356 in the background

    Photo: Unknown

    Jacqueline Evans de Lopez enjoyed a career in Mexican films and television until her death in 1989, along with the occasional small part in non-domestic productions. However, it is as one of only a small number female participants to tackle this extreme race that she is better remembered, at least outside her adopted country and particularly by Porsche enthusiasts.

    The sister car (#356/2-063) to the one shown in the preceding picture, at they appeared at Le Mans in 1951.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5551

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Stirling Moss was more used to being on the other end of a camera, so this shot of him using his Yashica 44, believed to have been taken at Monaco in 1959, makes quite a change. The camera would have been quite new then, having been introduced the year before and on this occasion Moss was driving Rob Walker’s Cooper-Climax which -like the majority of the field- failed to finish.

    While Moss is perhaps not a name that everyone would associate with Porsche, with the same team the following year he had some notable successes in F2, using a 718/2 (#201) that the factory had shrewdly loan the Walker team. The car, which Moss described as “a podgy flat four”, looked good in the team’s dark blue with a white nose band and he came 5th in the F2 Drivers Championship, Bonnier in the factory entry coming 3rd.

    Pictured at the Syracuse race in Sicily, Moss unfortunately retired with a dropped valve, although this was due to a lack of quality control at the component manufacturer rather than a driver error. That was after setting pole and the fastest race lap and the car was later bought and used widely by Carel de Beaufort in almost sixty events.

    In 1958 Moss had come 3rd with von Hanstein in the Buenos Aries 1000km driving a 550, one of a few outings he had with that model. He later drove RS Spyders and almost won the 1961 Targa Florio in a RS60 shared with Graham Hill, the gearbox failing less than 10km from the finish on the final lap. His affection for the RS remained with him and from 2010 to 2015 he owned an RS61 (#070) that had been supplied new to Bob Holbert.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

     

  • #5627

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Margie Smith-Haas is seen here at Le Mans in 1984 with her fellow racer and husband Paul Haas. Her appearance there was the first by an American female driver and she participated again the following year in a URD, although it retired. S-H had some considerable involvement with Porsches during her domestic and international racing career, including a highly modified 914 along with examples of 916, 911 Carrera RSR, Kremer CK5 and 924 Carrera GTR. Beginning with a 914 1.7 in the 1970’s she has remained faithful to Porsche road cars to this day.

    Her 1984 Le Mans entry was this 930 (#0030009), which she shared with Britons Paul Smith and David Ovey. The car did not have a particularly successful two seasons with the Charles Ivey team and this race was to prove no exception. They qualified 52nd out of 55, started 51st out of 53 and went out on lap 146 of 360 due to oil loss.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5706

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Taking a break for a quick drink (rather than a quick nap, as the picture appears to show) is Edgar Barth during the 1958 Goodwood TT. He was sharing this factory 718 RSK with Jean Bhera and having qualified 6th they finished 4th and won their class, beating all three Jaguar D-types that were among the 30 starters.

    550RS #120; 1957 Nurburgring 1000Km; Co-driver Maglioli; Grid 9th; 4th Overall; 1st Class

    Beginning his career -as did so many of the older drivers- as a motorcycle racer in 1933 at the age of 16, by 1953 he was racing cars for the EMW factory, post-war political events having located him -like the EMW (formerly BMW) works- in East Germany. Racing domestically and occasionally internationally with some success in these and other products of the Communist state, he was offered a Porsche works drive in 1956, an offer he subsequently took up when racing in West Germany. This drew a predictable response from the authorities in the East and so he prudently decided to remain in the West, his wife and young son fleeing to join him there.

    718 WRS #047; 1963 Le Mans; Co-driver Linge; Grid 23rd; 8th Overall; 1st Class

    Racing worldwide for Porsche he participated in all of the major events, often enjoying good placings including a class-winning 4th at Le Mans in 1958, a Targa Florio victory in 1959 -an event where he invariably did well- and a class win at Sebring in 1965. He was also a very successful hill climber, winning the European Mountain Championship three times and although mainly a racing sports car driver he had some single-seater outings for Porsche and even a one-off race in Rob Walker’s Cooper T66 in 1964, his penultimate year.

    718RSK; 1958 Goodwood TT; Co-driver Behra; Grid 6th; 4th Overall; 1st Class

    Father of career Porsche engineer and competition driver Jurgen, he unfortunately died when only 48 due to cancer. No doubt the offer to join Porsche came from von Hanstein and the two men must already have had some common ground, both having come from comfortable backgrounds in what became East Germany which they lost in the post-war division of the country.

    904-8 #008; 1964 Targa Florio; Co-driver Maglioli; 6th Overall; 1st Class

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5743

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A fine pairing of Porsche People here at the 1970 London Motor Show, with Richard Attwood and Hans Herrmann along with what was then still the genuine 917 that gave Porsche their first outright Le Mans win in the hands of these drivers.

    We have looked at Attwood in this section previously, so we’ll devote some space to Herrmann this time. Coming from a cafe/baking background, Herrmann began racing in 1952 using a Porsche 356 and jointly took a works model to the finish of the Mille Miglia the following year. 1953 also saw him finish at Le Mans in one of the 550 coupes and other notable Porsche results occurred during that and the following year. He also joined the Mercedes GP team for 1954/5.

    With the M-B withdrawal from F1 he returned to Porsche in 1956 and aside from drives with other sports (particularly Abarth) and GP makes -including a spectacular accident in a BRM at Avus in 1959- he completed the majority of his racing for the company. While he was successful behind the wheel of so many Porsche models it will always be the 917 and that historic 1970 Le Mans victory with which he will forever be associated.

    Perhaps wisely choosing to honour a promise that he made to his wife, he retired immediately from motor sport after that win, going on to spend decades as a successful businessman and as an ambassador for Porsche. His autobiography was tellingly titled ‘ I Survived’.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5768

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Although ‘The Flying Finn’ Leo Kinnunen was very much associated with sportscar racing in Porsches, he began by competing as a rally driver and at the end of his racing career returned to this with a win in the 1979 Arctic Rally in a 911. Inbetween he raced various Porsche models for the factory and for private teams (particularly the Finnish AAW organisation) including 908, 917 and 935 and was especially successful in the Interserie championship, winning the series in 1971, 1972 and 1973. In the latter year he also came home third in the 1000 Lakes Rally using a 911, beaten only by rallying greats Timo Makinen and Markku Alen.

    Given his obvious ability it is strange that his attempts at establishing an F1 career never succeeded, his initial drive with Lotus in 1971 being aborted before it even began. In 1974 he had another try, but a poor GP season in an under-financed, factory-leased (but rather inferior) Surtees TS16 brought him little reward. However, in sports cars he was very successful and at the 1970 Targa Florio (above) he set the fastest ever lap. Taken in conjunction with his other successes -he often co-drove JW 917’s with Rodriguez- he must be regarded as a first class driver, even if his is not a name that always comes readily to mind.

    Pictured above at the 1972 Silverstone Interserie Championship round we see him in the now blue/white Finnish AAW 917/10 (#004), a car in which he was very successful over a two year period. On his way to winning the championship again he scored a 2nd and a 1st in the two heats giving him the overall win that day.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5821

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Dutch nobleman Carel de Beaufort had a brief flirtation with rallying before taking up circuit racing. Beginning with a 356 and attracting the attention of Porsche he became a regular competitor in 550 and 718 models, but he harboured ambitions to take part in Grand Prix racing. In 1961 he purchased the first of two F2 718/2 models that he was to own, the F2 car (#201) previously lent to Rob Walker for Stirling Moss to use and now eligible for F1 under the latest rules.

    In the first picture we see de Beaufort standing in his 718/2 (#201) before the 1961 Dutch Grand Prix, while above he is sharing the second of the two 356B 2000GS Carrera GT’s (#122-992) at Le Mans in 1963. These cars, the last racing Porsches crafted wholly of aluminium, we not successful in the race but Carel continued to compete in sports cars and championship and non-championship F1 events until an accident when practicing for the 1964 German GP at the Nurburgring which claimed his short life.

    He is pictured above in the same GP in 718 #201 almost exactly two years before this fatality. While lacking the physical characteristics, that special something that sets great drivers apart and the right car to make any serious headway in F1, he was nonetheless a consistent and reliable driver there and in sports racing models. His humorous approach to life made him well-liked and many Porsche and other racing drivers attended his funeral, where von Hanstein was among those who spoke.

    Above we see Ecurie Maarsbergen on the road in 1963. The grandly-titled team actually just comprised Carel, his sister Cornelie and a part-time mechanic and was named after the family estate in Holland. One of the 718/2’s (#201 or 202) being towed by Carel’s Venezuelan-registered (for tax purposes) 1963 Chevrolet Impala.

    Pictured outside the family home is one of Carel’s 718/2’s, the occasion being a meeting of the Grand Prix Drivers Association. Founded to represent drivers interests -particularly in respect of safety- in 1961 under the Chairmanship of Stirling Moss, Jo Bonnier took over when he retired and the organisation still exists today after being disbanded between 1982 and 1994. Carel, Jim Clark and Graham Hill are amonng the famous faces seen above and Hill was to return to the house to lead Carel’s funeral procession beside von Hanstein.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5921

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Swede Joakim Bonnier was unusual among racing drivers in having an academic background -he was even at Oxford for a year- but he began motorcycle racing in his teens and instead of entering the family publishing business he started rallying in his early twenties.

    1961, 718/2, (probably #04)

    As with so many other drivers, motorcycles and rallying led to racing cars in 1953 and by 1956 when he was 26 he was taking part in Grands Prix, although a no-fault accident destroyed his works Maserati in his first GP and almost did the same to him!

    1960, 718RS60 (#043), Le Mans; Retired, piston failure, lap 191; Co-driver, Graham Hill

    Bonnier drove in F1 until 1971 but for some reason was never offered the drives that reflected his talent and his seasons were often patchy in terms of appearances and results. Latterly racing under his own account he also had three years driving for Rob Walker (the entrant of Stirling Moss) but in single-seaters he is probably best-known for partnering Dan Gurney in Porsche’s less than successful foray into GP racing, 15th in the 1961 and 1962 Drivers World Championships being no reflection on his ability or commitment.

    1961, 787 (#01), Monaco; Retired, fuel supply, lap 59; Herrmann’s 718/2 (#05) behind finished 9th

    Like most drivers of his era Bonnier was equally at home racing open and closed wheel cars and after various Maserati outings his first Porsche appearance was in a 356 Carrera at Reims in 1957. A Porsche works drive in a 718RSK at Sebring followed in 1959, the first of very many races in a variety of models and some excellent results, including wins at Sebring in 1960 and the Targa Florio in 1960 and 1963.

    1962, 718WRS (#047), Targa Florio; Retired, accident, lap 2, without driving; Co-driver, Dan Gurney (shown).

    From the late 1960’s he ran his own team in World Sportscar and CanAm events while still successfully driving for others and became a Lola agent. It was when competing in his own Lola at Le Mans in 1972 that he suffered a fatal accident after contact with a slower car, an ironic end for a man who had played a big part in the Grand Prix Drivers Association and had fought for better safety standards. It had been his 13th attempt at the race, although his only finish had been a 2nd in a Ferrari in 1964.

    1961, Monza, Italian GP; Bonnier (718/2) at left and some differences in stature among the drivers

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5927

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Member Simon Puttick has contributed this intriguing picture, interesting for the car as well as the driver. He writes:

    From the “thick” nose section and the early style rear view mirrors it looks like a 1982 car – this is backed up by the partial Rothmans livery which matches that used by the factory cars during the 1982 season – but where was it taken (Weissach?) and what was Stewart’s involvement – a road test for a magazine article perhaps? – and why can’t I find more photos – Jackie Stewart and a Porsche 956 must be worth a few rolls of film, surely?

    I have to confess to sharing Simon’s mystification, so can anyone help? The (1973 season?) helmet implies Stewart is going to drive the car, even though his clothing might not and the car certainly looks like a 1982 model. It appears that it could be #001, as aside from the nose it is carrying the livery that it wore when testing at Paul Ricard, some pictures of which will be coming up in due course. The nose could have easily been transferred from another car and given the layout of the sponsor stickers and the paint erosion and dirt that the car is wearing it looks to be from one of the June 1982 Le Mans team (#002/003/004). However -and there always has to be a ‘however’- by May 1982 #001 was in full Rothmans team colours and racing…

    Simon would like to see some more pictures of the area behind the cockpit and we would both like to unravel the facts behind this shot, so does anyone know more? Incidentally, Stewart almost co-drove a JW 917 with Steve McQueen at Le Mans in 1970 until it was made clear by the insurers of the Le Mans film the McQueen was far too valuable a property risk injury of death, so Stewart’s 1965 Rover-BRM outing with Graham Hill remains his only race there.

    Photo: Unknown

  • #5965

    Martin
    Keymaster

    May marks the first birthday of PPP’s independent existence, so many thanks to everyone who has contributed in any way and to anyone who has browsed this site. We have lots more material to use, so please keep visiting and posting your thoughts and pictures and thanks again to you all for your interest.

    Perhaps we should be breaking out the champagne like Dan Gurney in the above picture. A key player in the Porsche assault on F1 -giving them their only Championship GP win- we see him contemplating one of his rewards for winning the 1967 Race of Champions at Brands Hatch, by then driving one of his own cars. Sharing some of his prize of 100 bottles of Lanson champagne is the famed British engineer Harry Weslake, whose Rye-based company Weslake Research and Development built the V12 engine that powered Gurney’s winning AAR Eagle Mk1.

    Seen here in an 804 and looking as though he wishes to remain anonymous while talking to Porsche team-mate Jo Bonnier, his All American Racers company built almost 160 original and modified cars that won in various formulae and as well as his sports and grand prix Porsche drives he raced widely within and outside America in other open- and closed-wheel cars. At well over six feet tall he was perhaps not the ideal height for a racing driver, but this did not hamper him unduly in his career, the Ford GT40 famously being fitted with a roof ‘bubble’ to accommodate him.

    In 1969 he married Evi Butz who really also qualifies as one of our Porsche People. A Stuttgart native, she first joined Porsche in 1960 as an assistant to Huschke von Hanstein and a couple of years later met Gurney after von Hanstein asked him to give her a lift home. After leaving to work for the French Porsche importer Sonauto (she was a foreign languages graduate) and then moving on to edit a magazine she returned to supervise the Porsche press department in 1965, but emigrated to the US with Gurney when they married. The above picture shows Evi (right) and her co-author, the Swedish rally driver Ewy Rosqvist-von Korff, on the cover of their 1960’s book The Good Car Driver; The little Manual for the Lady at the Wheel.

    Photos: B&W-Ted Walker Archive; Colour-MVG

  • #6012

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Perhaps Jim Clark -pictured at the German Solitude circuit in 1961- is not commonly associated with Porsche, but at the beginning of his career he raced extensively in a 356 before moving on to bigger things. Having started winning in a Porsche in 1957 (when he was 21) he drove one on various occasions during 1958, alternating with the Border Reivers Jaguar D-Type and sometimes driving both cars at the same meetings. These included visits to the Nurburgring and Spa but the Porsche seems to have been used only once during 1959, by which time he was racing a combination of Lister and Lotus cars and it was with the latter make that he was to find his greatest fame.

    The 356 with which Clark is most associated is UUL 442, a 1957 1600 Super supplied new by AFN to bandleader and Brooklands driver Billy Cotton. However, Cotton only kept the car for four months before returning it and AFN then sold it to Jim Clark’s friend and fellow farmer Ian Scott Watson, who was associated with the Border Reivers team, an organisation perhaps less well-known than Ecurie Ecosse but established a little before them. Watson entered Clark in the car prior to selling it to him and he began winning immediately, so as well as using it as his road car he raced it 28 times, scoring 13 wins and failing to finish only once. Fortunately the car can still be seen racing today, as after just escaping scrapping in the 1970’s followed by a lengthy period in storage it was finally restored after it was rediscovered and its famous background came to light. It is said that Clark only sold the car after Colin Chapman -who in 1960 first gave him a drive in his new Formula Junior Lotus- intimated that it would look better if he drove a Lotus on the road too.

    It was in an F2 Lotus that Clark died at Hockenheim in 1968. He had been due to race a Ford P68 at Brands Hatch the same day in the BOAC 500 sports car race but contractual obligations to Firestone took him to compete in Germany instead. It is therefore ironic that his accident is thought to have been caused by a deflating tyre.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #6017

    Martin
    Keymaster

    With their attention attracted by something off-camera at the 1982 Spa 1000Km, we see Rothmans Porsche 956 team drivers (l-r) Ickx/Mass (1st) and Schuppan/Bell (2nd). With Porsche taking victories in half of the eight races against strong Lancia opposition they and Ickx secure their respective championships that year, although as the Lancia LC1’s were running to Group 6 rather than Group C regulations they were not eligible for manufacturers points, Rondeau being the only serious Championship rival to Porsche.

    We have already looked at Mass and Bell here, so perhaps should spare a few words for the others. Australian Vern Schuppan moved to Britain to forge a career in single-seaters and having won the 1971 UK Formula Atlantic championship he soon graduated to F1. While not attaining the sort of GP drives that might have capitalised on his talents he wisely began a parallel career in racing sports cars with Mirage. Having his first Porsche drive in a works 936 at Le Mans in 1981 he was to be found at the wheel of many factory and private 956 and 962 models for the following ten years and he also made the Schuppan 962CR road car, a project that failed for reasons well beyond his control. His time in CART and USAC racing should also not be overlooked.

    Belgian Jackie (Jacques-Bernard) Ickx is synonymous with Porsche and still represents them today. However, prior to this association beginning in 1976 he had a varied career, competing in F1 every season (but sometimes a little sporadically) between 1966 and 1979 with numerous teams, from majors like Ferrari and Lotus down to the likes of Wolf, Ensign and Ligier. In sports cars he drove for Ford -taking his first of six Le Mans wins in a GT40 in 1969- and Mirage (later taking another LM win with them in 1975) and had a partnership with Ferrari from 1970-73, although he had first raced that marque in the 1960’s. His ten years with Porsche are probably best remember by many, giving him another four Le Mans victories and many great performances in 935, 936, 956 and 962 models, although his wins in events like the Dakar Rally and the Bathurst 1000 are also noteworthy.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

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