Porsches Reborn

This topic contains 5 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Martin 1 week, 6 days ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #3816

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Looking at first glance very much like a 917, this is actually the Blatzheim/Kraus 907 spyder (#022) seen at the 1970 Nurburgring 1000Km. It was entered by Blatzheim and having qualified 18th out of 54 starters its engine failed before half distance. This was the first outing for the car in rebodied Spyder form after it had suffered a heavy crash during the very wet BOAC 1000 the previous month and it had to miss another German race only a week before this one due to not being finished. While retaining the 907 front bodywork design (and it was this area that took the brunt of the impact) the opportunity was taken to give the rest of the previously closed car a 908/917-type makeover to very satisfactory effect. It would be interesting to know just how good the car was aerodynamically after the conversion, as although this began as a standard model the 907 was one of the slipperiest ever Porsches when in long-tail form.

    Here is a picture of the car at Brands immediately after its accident.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • This topic was modified 11 months ago by  Martin.
  • #4899

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Seen at Kyalami in 1970 is the not immediately recognisable 906 (#117) of SA entrant and sometime driver Clive van Buuren, a car that started its life in Sweden in conventional form. By the time that this picture was taken at the Kyalami Nine Hours -where it finished 12th from a grid 18th- its bodywork had undergone some major surgery involving extending the wheelarches, removing the roof, panelling over the rear deck and half the cockpit and fitting an aero screen. Further modifications took place for 1971 when it acquired a Ferrari 312PB-style tail, a prominent roll bar and a large wrap-around screen.


    The car was an interesting if not particularly attractive one-off (unlike Australian Porsche importer Alan Hamilton’s 906 spyder conversion, for instance) and even though it retained its original nose it looked quite unlike a 906, having hints of all sorts of its contemporaries in both of its forms. I recall that there were some open 906’s constructed in Portugal and also raced in Angola, so I must look out some pictures of these other variants on this theme.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 10 months, 2 weeks ago by  Martin.
  • #4904

    Martin
    Keymaster

    These three very different pictures of this 917 (#001) only cover a year of its life. The car is the one seen with ‘917’ on its nose in the famous pictures taken when the initial batch of 25 917’s were inspected in the factory yard in April 1969, but it is captured below at the Frankfurt Motor Show that September in this new livery. Perhaps the colour scheme points to how the works cars might have looked had they continued to be directly run during the 1970 season?

    However, with the signing of the deal for John Willment Automotive to manage the factory team in conjunction with its Gulf sponsorship the car was immediately repainted in a unique version of the forthcoming livery for the launch of the project and subsequent publicity appearances, although no 917LH of this type raced in these colours. A shot showing beneath the rear bodywork can be found in Porsche Details Post#5694.

    A year later it was converted to K configuration and painted to replicate the famous Attwood/Hermann Le Mans winner and it is in this form we see it at the London Motor Show in October 1970. The real LM winner was still being raced by the Porsche Salzburg team at this time and had come 4th at Zeltweg very shortly before this picture was taken. That car was entered in Martini colours the following year prior to its disposal, while this unraced and only lightly tested car continued (and continues) to appear in its place.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 10 months, 2 weeks ago by  Martin.
    • #5693

      Martin
      Keymaster

      917 #001 -and the model as a whole- making its first public appearance at the Geneva Salon on March 12th 1969. That looks to be Rico Steinemann at left with the sheaf of papers, who had been responsible for introducing and unveiling the car that day. Shell, whose sticker on the front wing is strangely in monochrome, must have been really pleased about that big Valvoline sign!

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5630

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Paul Kunkel, who owned the Wendler RS001 featured in our Porsche Partially section among other Porsches, also had this 906. Seen above at speed, it suffered this unfortunate damage.

    However, worse was to come. On a soaking track at Brands Hatch during a Rochester Motor Club test day in February 1970 it was not only crashed but inverted.

    This left it in this sorry state. Apologies for the quality of the following pictures, obviously taken in a workshop under very poor lighting conditions.

    Luckily, the car was rebuilt as can be seen here, although its chassis number is still unknown. Throughout the period covered by these shots it had the distinctive upholstery shown in Post#5089 in our Details – Interior section.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5852

    Martin
    Keymaster

    When the factory decided to dispose of their 908/3 models in 1971 I’m sure that they were not expecting that some of them would still be racing ten years later. A steady programme of development kept the cars surprisingly competitive and below is #012 at the Brands Hatch 1000Km in 1974, where it was being run by Joest Racing and Barth/Haldi took it to 6th from a grid 26th. Aside from some front and rear modifications it still looked not unlike it did above when it had its first outing at the Nurburgring 1000Km for the JW team in 1971, where Siffert retired.

    By the time that the picture below of the same car was taken in 1980 at the Silverstone Six Hours it had acquired various body modifications, especially at the rear where a large set-back wing and enclosed backs to the wheelarches had been incorporated. Barth was again sharing the driving, this time with owner Siggi Brunn, and they took 2nd from a grid 8th in this World Championship round.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

This site is protected by wp-copyrightpro.com

Skip to toolbar