Production Cars

Home Forums Categories Porsche Road – Road models Production Cars

This topic contains 54 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Martin 3 weeks, 1 day ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #4405

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The notice on the transporter says that Porsche are ‘Building on Achievement’, a statement that some might have contested at that time after the introduction of the front-engined range of cars. With hindsight we know that these models opened new markets for Porsche and it also scored some notable competition successes, something always important to the company. This 924S is shown being unloaded from the transporter when brand new.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This topic was modified 1 year ago by  Martin.
  • #4411

    Martin
    Keymaster

    It is not clear why this early 911 was photographed when so dirty, but we can still enjoy its crisp design.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Martin.
  • #4416

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A rather sad 1954/55 356 pre-A Cabriolet that looks to be nearing the end of its life, pictured in an industrial yard somewhere in Britain during the 1960s or 1970s and it has certainly not survived under that registration. It doesn’t actually look to be too bad, although things invariably appear better in pictures than in reality and if it had ended up in this situation there was probably a good reason, or even reasons, for it.

    It is always interesting as to how expensive cars come so far down in the world. This one was a rare car here even when this picture was taken, but not as rare as that bizarrely-bodied Thames 400E van, whose driver obviously forgot that it was a bit wider than the standard model!

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4922

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Another car in less than perfect condition is this rather badly bent 911 Turbo. Registered in June 1980 and pictured only 28 months later it has all the appearance of being a write-off, but records show that its last road tax was recorded as being due on February 1st 1986 so it obviously found its way back on to the road, but only for a while.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    It would be interesting to know more about DWL 320V if anyone can fill in the gaps in its story.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Martin.
  • #4923

    Martin
    Keymaster

    It might be the same photographer at work in these pictures, as they seem to like rocks as a background!

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Martin.
  • #4939

    Martin
    Keymaster

    There is nothing special about this picture, it is just a rather nice shot of a 356B taken in Switzerland in the 1970’s. The car was quite likely to be ten or more years old at the time but looks to be in excellent condition.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Martin.
  • #4940

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This early shot of a 930 captures its aggressive frontal appearance very well.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Martin.
    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Martin.
  • #4942

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This particular 1974 Carrera RS was used extensively in factory publicity photos when new, although this shot that allows a view under the sill is not particularly flattering.

    The same car, with the child on the right wearing a pair of trousers not dissimilar to the seat material found in Porsches during the 1970’s.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Martin.
    • #5738

      Martin
      Keymaster

      The same car was road tested by Jerry Sloniger and this might just be the first recorded instance of someone using that spoiler as a tea tray (and see Post#5187 below), Mrs Sloniger obliging with the beverage.

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5740

      Chris Sherwood
      Participant

      Well, Mrs Sloniger may have been the first, but she was only “scratching the surface” of its true potential, as demonstrated by my late step mother in 1975 (post 5187) and still in service in the summer months. I can’t think why Porsche didn’t do a picnic set in the options list..

      Chris.

  • #4943

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A well-travelled and German-registered 356C is caught at rest in a French courtyard. It is carrying what are obviously Monte Carlo Rally plates but not in the usual red and closer examination reveals them to be the blue ‘PRESSE’ type for the 1964 event.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Martin.
  • #4993

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Parked in the paddock at Donington in the 1980’s is this nice 914, although those US-specification lamps on the front wings didn’t do the model any favours.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5076

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A nice 1974 publicity grouping allows us to compare three different 911s. Their colours certainly reflect the period.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5373

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Another view of  two of the cars seen above and the same model, who crops up in a number of pictures taken at this time.

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5078

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This views of an early 924 in one of the more vibrant colours serve to emphasise what a good piece of styling it was. It is such a shame that -like the 914- it was dogged by its mixed parentage for so long rather than being taken for what it was intended to be.

    Porsche writer Jerry Sloniger took many pictures to accompany the articles that he supplied to various magazines and so after taking the photo above he added a removable sign to the door for his next assignment. This road test was undertaken for a slightly more obscure publication than usual, the long-established Finnish car and technology publication Tekniikan Maailma (Technology World), which has been hitting the news-stands (and these days the internet too) since 1953.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5094

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Just to show that the Boxster Spyder ‘shower cap’ is not a new invention, here is a batch of 356 Speedsters at the factory in the late 1950’s so attired to protect their hoods during transit.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5102

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The name of English-domiciled American Paul Kunkel crops up in connection with various Porsches and these two pictures are one of those occasions. Dutch registered and possibly taken when still in Holland, this is a pre-A 356 boasting some very early features. From these it looks to have been made up to early 1952 and is seen in as-acquired condition. Hopefully the car still exists as a restored example.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5137

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Strangely, the registration OPR 911 is no longer recorded and perhaps the same fate may have befallen this 911 to which it is attached. It is pictured in a service area during the 1981 Manx International Rally and behind it between the vans is the 911SC of Rohrl/Giestdörfer that retired with a driveshaft problem while going well.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5184

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Contrasts in Porsche open air motoring with this 356B…

    …and this 914.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5187

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    A TURBO TALE

    My Late Father, Clive Sherwood was a Patent Attorney with a successful Practice in Birmingham and thus able to indulge his love of quality, performance cars.  By the early 1970s, for his daily drive he had progressed through Bristols and a Jensen FF to Porsche cars, to which he remained loyal for many years. I recall watching him peel the “Carrera” body stickers off his new RST in 1973 (RLO 6L – I still have the original order form and invoice on file), as he hated “marketing frippery” and suchlike, removing dealer stickers and badging at any opportunity.

    For the 1975 model year the 3.0 Turbo was launched and a PCGB demonstrator was taken around the UK dealership network by the well known and successful Porsche racing driver, Nick Faure.
    Father duly booked his place at Swinford Motors of Lye, Stourbridge and I managed to cadge a lift along for the ride, crunched up in the back.  What followed was to be a seminal experience for both of us.  Rumour had it that the local Chief Constable had been invited along the previous day for a spirited demonstration and was persuaded that there may be pressing engagements elsewhere for his traffic officers the following day!
    In those days, the dual carriageway from Hagley to the M5 junction at Lydiate Ash and then on to Rubery was a joyous road with fast, sweeping corners that could be taken at very high speed. (Indeed, it had caused me some grief on previous occasions, once returning from a high speed run on a Bimota motorcycle to find the rear tyre had shredded and another time losing control along the same stretch on black ice in my 356SC). The run Nick Faure took us on left us rendered virtually speechless, and having the desired effect, Dad immediately placed his order.

    Chassis no: 93005 70 0225 was invoiced on 26th June 1975 in silver with blue full leather at a price of £14,752.36 (twice the price of a standard 911), with a ’74 Carrera, UGO 70M (coincidently also c/n 225) and a ’74 911, WMD 3M being taken in part exchange.
    It was one of two Turbos sold by Swinford Motors that year, out of a total of 22 cars imported by PCGB in 1975. (18 in m/y 1976 and 34 in m/y 1977, giving a total of only 74 3.0 Turbos imported to the UK in the 3 years of their production – source: PCGB).

    In those days, Clive was a serial car changer and sold the car on 6th February 1976 with a mileage of 3,766 to a Mr Fox of Fox’s Dairy, Redcar, Cleveland.
    In May of that year, whilst Mr Fox was on a motoring holiday in France, the car was stolen from Cannes.
    Then, gaining suitably comprehensive but totally counterfeit Italian papers, Italian Handbook (genuine Porsche) and a generous supply of officially stamped documents, it was put on a ship bound for Sydney, Australia by virtue of all this dodgy documentation.
    A Mr Laurie O’Neil of Double Bay agreed to buy the car and transfer payment to Switzerland on its arrival.  However, on inspection of the car, Mr O’Neil discovered shards of glass under the carpet and signs of the number plates not being original. (Access had been gained by breaking the small 1/4 light glass in the driver’s door, thankfully preserving the heated front screen).  There was also the conundrum of a RHD car being on Italian plates.  His suspicions aroused, he contacted Porsche Germany and the truth was unveiled, whereupon Customs immediately impounded the car.

    Dad had clearly regretted his earlier sale and in 1977 contacted Mr Fox only to find the car was with Sydney Customs and owned by Royal Insurance, them having paid out to Mr Fox.  There followed protracted negotiations to buy the car and after examination and a report by the local Porsche dealership, a price of £8,000 as it stood was finally agreed. My father arranged shipping at a cost of £930.41 and after various delays, the car set sail on November 8th, landing at Tilbury Docks on 20th December 1977 in the middle of a dockers strike.  Following clearance after the Christmas break, it was delivered to Swinford Motors for a full service, it being found the only item needing attention was a sticky boost pressure regulator valve.  The car then led a life of semi-retirement with only occasional use although the registration 911 MOB was acquired and put on the car.

    One fine Sunday whilst visiting, in a weak moment, Dad asked me to go down to the local garage to fill up the car.  Seizing my chance, I made a diversion to a local dual carriageway with a long enough straight, where I thought the “big 150” might be achieved…
    Maximum revs through the gears quickly saw everything whiz by with dizzying speed before some heavy braking was VERY urgently required to prevent me becoming part of the scenery at the roundabout. “Job done” and elated, I tootled back and stood it on the drive creaking and groaning, to receive a stern reprimand from Dad – for forgetting to get a receipt for the petrol!

    Come 1987 and with the car getting little use, Dad persuaded me to buy it from him (for £15,000 – Dad always did like a profit!).  I ran it for a while, but finding it well beyond my pocket, sold it at 17,000 miles to Mr Roy Fournier of Staffordshire, a serial collector of Porsches and Ferraris.
    As the years rolled by, Dad often mused as to what had become of the Turbo before he sadly passed away in 2001.

    Incredibly, in September 2005, I saw the car advertised for £30,000 with still only 21,000 miles on the clock. Part of a car collection in Shropshire since 1989, it was being sold due to the retirement and emigration of the owner. The sale was being handled by a friend of his, whom Dad had known well, but the connection had never been made earlier.
    On inspection, the new set of tyres I had put on in 1987 were still virtually unworn but lethally hard due to the intervening 18 years.  Condition otherwise unchanged I just had to buy it back!

    During our ownership, the car was serviced by Chris Best at supplying Main Dealer, Swinford Motors and subsequently by Chris Best and David Moore of Two Plus Two, Brierley Hill, set up by them following the demise of Swinford Motors in the 1990s.  To this day, Chris Best still bears the scars from the engine lid dropping on his head in 1975 and, on my reacquisition, insisted on fitting a 2nd hydraulic strut!

    The car had a sympathetic body refurbishment by Autofarm in 2012, has now done 32,000 miles and my eldest son is insured to drive it whilst accompanied by me. However, it will be a few years yet before I ask him to pop down to the garage to fill it up…

     

    “The most expensive picnic table in the world”  Summer 1975. Published Motor Sport Oct 1975.

    (I will post some other period photos but I think the file too big for this posting to support more).

  • #5213

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A Goodwood car park scene that looks not unlike one that might be witnessed at a meeting there today, this view actually dates from April 1962. Unfortunately,  the 1961 356B does not appear to have survived, at least not under this registration.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5217

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    1973 2.7 Carrera in the Lake District.  Father was pleased with himself for doing a “double Castle” (140 mph) on the way back down the M6. Reference is to Barbara Castle who brought in the 70 mph limit.

  • #5218

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    Carrera 3.0 1978 “Winter wonderland”

  • #5219

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    Donnington Park, Porsche / Swinford Motors track day circa 1979.  Yours truly with my somewhat ratty Targa.  I beat all the smart new cars in the driving tests though! Fathers 928 to the left.

  • #5220

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    2.7 Carrera RLO 6L  in 1973. Reg later changed to UGO 70M. First job on delivery was to remove the blue Carrera side scripting!

  • #5221

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    1984 factory visit to see build of 928S2. Special order Pearlescent White.  The factory had big problems getting the paint right! 

  • #5222

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    TGU 4F. Early 1970’s photo.  Not sure what model this is.

  • #5223

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    Dad took this rather non-descript photo in 1984 on factory visit. Was it taken because of the man and if so, who is it?

     

  • #5224

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Thanks for posting these, Chris and for your previous contribution. The question that always springs to my mind when looking at the cars in old photos is ‘where are they now’ so I checked the registrations. RLO 6L is currently recorded as SORN, its MOT having expired in June 2014 and it’s later registration is now on a 1973 Ferrari. 911 MOB is taxed and MOT’d into 2019 and 928 ACE is still being carried by a 928, although a 1992 model. Of course, the original 928, your Targa and the green 911 may still exist under different numbers as 70% of all Porsches made are said to still be with us! Perhaps seeing them here will jog someone’s memory.

    • #5226

      Chris Sherwood
      Participant

      Thanks for the info Martin.  I have the original order paperwork and invoice for 2.7 Carrera RLO 6L and tried the Club to see if the owner was a member and contactable but unfortunately not.  However a strange thing happened.  A few years back, travelling along a back road in West Sussex, what should come barrelling towards me but a silver 2.7 Carrera reg RLO 6L! Seems it had been repainted silver from the original white. It was going too fast and in the opposite direct for me to do anything about it.

      Its later reg UGO 70M, Dad put on a 1973 Ferrari 246GTS Dino, so looks like it is still on that car. I was with him when he bought it for £3,950!

      911 MOB is on Dad’s 1975 930 Turbo which I found and repurchased in 2005 and still own.

      928 ACE  (found by me on a Series 1 Land Rover in the 1970’s) was put on the brown 928 pictured and later the 1984 928S2.

  • #5225

    Hartwig Rietz
    Participant

    Visiting the Nürburgring in 1991, when the Group C teams were testing, I ran over this dp cargo in the paddocks. For sure a very good looking interpretation of the Porsche trans axle theme.

    In the background we see the transporter of Konrad Motorsport; they brought their 962 to this test session.dp cargo

    • #5235

      Martin
      Keymaster

      With DP and Konrad we have two names associated with Porsche racing, although neither are as well known as they might be.

      DP were involved with various Porsche projects from their establishment in 1973 and from the mid-1970’s they began designing and making bodywork for the 911’s and 935’s produced by Kremer. Although their name stands for Design & Plastic they also undertook mechanical work and at one time even produced a one-off road-going version of a 962 called the DP62. Their Cargo model pictured above looked well proportioned enough to have been factory-produced and while these were 944-based there was at least one 924 version with flatter rear wings. DP are still in business today under the direction of the son of the founder and cater for many Porsche models.

      Konrad were established in Austria at around the same time as DP, although they relocated to Germany in 1976. While strongly associated with racing the 911 in various championships nationally and internationally along with their 962’s they have also been active with other makes and once even designed their own (unsuccessful) Group C car.

  • #5260

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Three flat-four Porsches make an interesting line-up in this picture, taken during the celebration of the 25th anniversary of the company (and here we are at the 70th; how time flys!). The very early and late 356 models -even with different body styles- give some idea of the numerous changes that took place during the life of those cars but the vehicle that should capture our interest is the one in the background, which was also 356-engined.

    It is a Type 597 (or ‘Hunter’), a model on which Porsche spent a not inconsiderable amount of money in development but which was not a success with the general public and did not get the hoped-for military sales either. Beginning with a 1500 engine this was soon upgraded to the 1600 unit but during its 1955-58 production life only 71 were made, making it a rare and expensive failure for the company.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5940

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Here are some more pictures of the Hunter, one of the rarest of Porsche models with perhaps only fifteen examples surviving.

      It also incorporated some 356 suspension components and offered impressive performance on and off road (and it could also float!), with useful features such as drive to the front axle being able to be selected while in motion.

      After any chance of military sales had evaporated even revisions for the final year of production failed to capture much public attention. Manufacture ceased but plans were made to relaunch a revised range of models, although these were wisely curtailed.

      Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5404

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This picture is more often seen in the version which includes von Hanstein’s secretary Thora Hornung (then Miss Gutmann) acting as a model, as she had previously done for some 356 shots taken at the factory, as here. The 901 was about to be launched at the 1963 Frankfurt Show, but to avoid exposing it to the gaze of the press -and also to do the job as cheaply as possible!- Hanstein decided to have the company photographer Ole-Kirk Jensen shoot the car in the works yard.

    The result was carefully cropped to avoid the line of 356’s on top of the bank in the background and to add some contrast with the white car Sales Director Harald Wagner provided yellow, red and blue 356’s for the background.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5474

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Two shots looking to have been taken in the paddock at Oulton Park in the early 1970’s and featuring a pair of then still fairly new 911’s. This yellow example, registered in April 1969, appears not to be still with us but additional interest is provided by the background. This includes a Cox GTM kit car, a Bugle beach buggy -the buggy craze was then at its height in somewhat unsuitable Britain- and the type of dropside VW truck so often to be found ferrying racing cars around, the load sometimes overhanging the rear to an alarming degree.

    However, the other 911 still exists and was registered in December 1970. Currently MOT’d and still red I’m sure that the current owner would be interested in this picture. Here the background shows a Fiat 900E Amigo, a vehicle prone to epic corrosion even by the standards of the time and that popular means of transporting a racing car, the converted luxury coach.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5498

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A very early 930 road test with Jerry Sloniger taking an appropriate break at the Hotel Porschehof, located in Zell am See and once owned by the family

    A view that shows just how far we have come in terms of panel gaps and fit in the intervening period!

    The red tartan upholstery inserts can just be seen here.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5513

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    Glamour photoshoot from 1976 with father’s 911 (also used but not relevant to this thread, 1929 Lagonda, Ferrari Dino GTS and Morgan Plus 8).  Taken at Lydiate Ash House, Bromsgrove and only came to light this year.  Rather a surprise as father was a very prudish man!  My parents were divorced by 1976 so us kids were living elsewhere and no knowledge of this photoshoot until the slides were found recently.

    https://porschepicturespast.com/wp-content/uploads/hm_bbpui/5513/2ddwz1gm7m40aoqbkt22vtcy3fc5rf5k.jpeghttps://porschepicturespast.com/wp-content/uploads/hm_bbpui/5513/1vnbhbi7phet6hgbwx79umh0baepbkm3.jpeghttps://porschepicturespast.com/wp-content/uploads/hm_bbpui/5513/8e017kpvsi72pdpn1eclmathmk2179p5.jpeg

  • #5553

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Pictured in Casino Square, Monaco at around the time of the Grand Prix in C1970/71 we see two 911’s (one a Targa)…

    …along with some contemporary fashion.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5580

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Cult US film director Russ Myer used is own 356C in his infamous 1965 picture Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!, seen here with one of its stars, Tura Satana, who drove it onscreen. Filmed in the Californian desert -hence its dusty appearance- the car was supplied by Hollywood VW and Porsche dealer Bob Smith (1914-2001) whose family company still holds various franchises. The car appeared on some of the film publicity (see our Advertising>Films Post#5161) and the combination of a door mirror on one side and a wing mirror on the other is perhaps unusual.

    Photo: Unknown

  • #5631

    Martin
    Keymaster

    While the registration lives on (it’s now worn by a 2004 911) I don’t know if this Carrera 3.0 does too. I believe that this picture was taken at a Goodwood sprint in the 1980’s and note the 924 Carrera GT in the background.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5692

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Emerson Fittipaldi goes some way to being one of our Porsche People, having raced his own Fitti-Porsche (see our Porsche Partially section) and driven a Carrera RSR in the IROC series, a 917 in the Buenos Aires 1000Km and a Willi Kauhsen 917/10 in an Interserie race. Here he is on -rather than in- an appropriately registered 914 at the much-lamented Crystal Palace circuit in 1970. The occasion was the Alcoa London Trophy Formula 2 race, where his Lotus came 3rd and that looks to be Clay Regazzoni (2nd in a Tecno) beside him. The unforgiving nature of the outside of the track will also be noted, as will the unprotected trees on the inside of the bend!

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5702

    Martin
    Keymaster

    How prophetic that sign on the building turned out to be in these shots of new 911’s taken on a wet day 45 years ago.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5735

    Martin
    Keymaster

    While the 924 took decades to establish itself in the eyes of some Porsche enthusiasts (and there are still some pockets of resistance!), the sporting and racing variants appeared quite early in its life. Here we look at some of these, beginning with the above Carrera GT prototype as exhibited at The Frankfurt motor show in 1979, although it was billed as a styling exercise at that time. Note the Porsche umbrellas with German flag stripes which match the stand decoration just visible at left.

    Prior to the car breaking cover at the show there had been three prototypes which incorporated some variations, such as the large bonnet air intake seen above,

    Next and forming an interesting contrast with the preceding picture is the prototype of the Carrera GTS, which was also finished in white unlike the production models.

    With 400 GT’s made to allow its Group 4 racing homologation, a further 59 evolution GTS models were manufactured, some of which are seen here in the works yard.

    Within those 59 GTS models were a further 15 Clubsport versions, the one above being purchased new by Richard Lloyd and is seen outside his GTi Engineering business at Silverstone. Lloyd became well known for racing a 924 Carrera GTR in Canon livery prior to graduating to 956 and 962 models and carrying out extensive modifications to them.

    A Carrera GT cornering hard but looking very stable in a picture that looks to have been taken at Weissach.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5751

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Many will be familiar with that landmark hostelry near Silverstone, The Green Man. Some may even recall the time when it was just a small pub rather than the much-extended building plus a separate hotel that it is today, but back in 1953 its immediate surroundings had this rather run down appearance. On the weekend of the sports car race supporting the British GP the American Cunningham team had been parked up there overnight alongside this Swedish registered 356 pre-A, although it’s not clear if the caravan was their accommodation!

    Quite why the Porsche was present is so far unknown as there were no Swedish drivers in the GP or the sports car race but it is an insight into the way in which things were done at the time that the Cunningham C4-R’s appear to have been driven to the race. In fact, given their temporary French registration plates they may well have been driven to Britain after competing at Le Mans the previous month, where they did rather better than they managed on this occasion.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5760

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    Ah!  Now we know where Porsche got the idea for the rear spoilers!

    • #5765

      Martin
      Keymaster

      There is quite an intricate bracket attached to the luggage rack to support the board, so perhaps this was an accessory that could be bought as there were many non-factory additions made in America. Inevitably a Californian-registered Convertible D (1958-59?) with its US-specification bumper and club or event badge on the grille, it was supplied by Storey-Ricketts Porsche & Volkswagen of Long Beach, a former Hudson dealer who I believe sold Porsche from the mid-1950’s to the late 1960’s. The picture is not clear enough the read the dates on the plate.

  • #5761

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    And another on the sporting theme:

  • #5762

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    A couple of interesting shots here that Martin will no doubt be able to knowledgeably caption:

    • #5766

      Martin
      Keymaster

      I’ll try my best, the one below being particularly worthy of attention. Here Ferry Porsche stands at the 356A production line in 1958/9 while production of the Convertible D and coupe pauses for this picture. The assembled bodies were delivered from their builders so that the mechanical units could be added as the cars were pushed from one workstation to another while mounted on three-wheeled trolleys. It was well into the 911 period before a conventional moving production line was installed.

  • #5763

    Chris Sherwood
    Participant

    • #5767

      Martin
      Keymaster

      As the 718 was bodied -like the 550- by Wendler it is tempting to think that this must have been taken at the Wendler works and that the Opel Blitz truck was going to deliver them to Porsche. The lorry may belong to Porsche as theirs had signwriting on the door as here and they used this model, although the company name would have been on the outside open dropsides. It looks to have been specially constructed for delivering rolling chassis’ and collecting completed cars.

      The 356A Carrera 1500GS (#12303) in the foreground is really interesting though. This is the car driven to a class win by von Hanstein/Pucci in the 1958 Targa Florio and in the same year von Hanstein used it to win his class at the 1958 Venezuela GP sports car race at Caracas, a 750km event. There he came 8th overall behind some much bigger cars from Ferreri and Mercedes and even beat a couple of 300SL’s. This also appears to be the car used by von Hanstein/Linge/Cuevas to contest the Sebring 12 Hours earlier that year, where they were again class winners and came 10th overall.

      Other events for the car in 1958 included hill climbs in Greece, Italy, Switzerland and France, the Reims 12 hours, the Messina 10 Hours and shorter races at Zeltweg and Avus, usually in the hands of von Hanstein or von Frankenberg and invariably scoring class or overall wins. After its outing at Caracas it was sold to Venezuelan Pilade Ronchieri who raced it widely and in 1960 after breaking down in Colombia it was sold to Fernando Cortez Boshell who raced it with Guido Borrero Borrero in Colombia and Peru. In 1962 the mechanical parts and the body parted company, the former being fitted into a Speedster and the shell, after languishing for some time, was fitted with a Volkswagen engine modified with EMPI parts and raced successfully in Columbia during the 1970’s.

      Due to the intractable nature of the Carrera engine the Speedster was eventually refitted with its original motor and following a tortuous series of events the Carrera body, engine and sundry other components were reunited in the 1980’s. Today the car remains in Colombia and is fully restored.

  • #5816

    Martin
    Keymaster

    As part of the Gulf-Porsche 917 sponsorship deal it was also specified that three 911S models were to be provided by Porsche for the use of Gulf-Porsche team personnel. Here is one of these in a publicity shot, filling up at a Gulf petrol station -of course- in 1971. Apart from the car, period items of interest in the scene include signs indicating ‘self service’ on the pump (attendants still being quite common), ‘cheques welcome’ (the reverse of today), two/three/four star fuels (but no high-octane five star), paint brush cleaner and engine degreaser at 4/9 a quart (less than 25p) and a gallon of Gulf 20/50 oil at something over 18/- (90-plus Pence!).

    The same car is seen in the Brands Hatch paddock, but does anyone know the identity of the people?

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5861

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A well compose and unusual 914 publicity picture. With the optional Mahle-made wheels of this design (there were two similar four-bolt designs, one again by Mahle) this looks to be a 914-6 of the 1970-72 period.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5966

    Martin
    Keymaster

    If you have a copy of the 1988 book The Porsche 911 – In All Its Forms by the late Chris Harvey you will be familiar with this car, as a picture from this session appears on its cover. Happily the 911, a 1972 2.7, is still on the road and with that 911 number plate it is quite likely that it was supplied by AFN. Below the car is seen in the workshop of the late Bob Watson while restoration work is being carried out.

    Does anyone know anything about the car in the foreground of the above picture, as its registration is no longer recorded?

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

This site is protected by wp-copyrightpro.com

Skip to toolbar