Rallying – Non-UK/Specific

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This topic contains 47 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Martin 1 day, 3 hours ago.

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  • #4183

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Liberally covered in Kenyan mud and bearing a bit of accident damage, this is the 911 Carrera RS  of Edgar Herrmann/Hans Schuller on the 1974 East African Safari Rally. The car retired with an engine problem and that may be why it is stationary at this point. Note the handles either side of the rear window for manhandling the car if became bogged down and also the roof rack and an additional bumper even at the rear.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4186

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The Almeras brothers from the South of France founded their company in 1968 and their racing team in 1971. They have been Porsche preparers and competitors in rallying, hill climbing and circuit racing since this time and first entered Le Mans in 1976. While primarily known for their work with the 911, here is their 924GTS rallying on the Tour de Course in 1981 with Jacques Almeras/’Tilber’, although they unfortunately went out later due to an accident.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4189

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Some frantic work is taking place on this 911 Carrera on the 1979 Ypres 24H Rally. Crewed by Vincent/Huret the car retired after an accident, the aftermath of which might be being addressed here. This car and other 911’s can be seen in this film of this tough event, including this one having a slight off.

    911’s No. 10 (1st) and No.14 (2nd) are shown on the same event. The winning SC was crewd by the French team of Beguin/Lenne with the Carrera RS 2.7 of Belgians Delbar/Lux just over five minutes behind. Also identifiable is the No.17 Carrera RS 3.0 of Belgians Moortgat/Deconinck, although this was eliminated by an accident.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 10 months, 3 weeks ago by  Martin.
    • #5581

      Martin
      Keymaster

      From this picture it looks as though the repairs to No.2 were completed…

      …although the front No.10 bears the scars of impact.

      Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4974

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Often to be found behind the wheel of a 904, this is Jean-Pierre Hanrioud with J-C Syda in a 911S on the 1967 Tulip Rally. Unfortunately they, along with the 911S of Zasada, were the first to retire and so this shot of the car beginning a stage must have been taken very early in the event.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4975

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Here is Henri Toivonen partnered by Ian Grindrod in this 911SCRS on the 1984 Costa Brava Rally. Unfortunately this immaculately turned out car retired due to a driveshaft failure but it appears briefly in this film, as does Henri.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4986

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The 1978 Rally d’Antibes was a tarmac event and here we see Vincent/’Tilber’ throwing up the gravel in their 911 Carrera 3.0. They finished 4th behind two Stratos and Michele Mouton in her Fiat Abarth, in fact they were only just over a minute behind her so quite an impressive performance from this French/Mongasque pairing.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5028

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The 1957 Tour de France Auto and this is the slightly battered Carrera-engined Speedster of Storez/Buchet which finished a commendable 7th out of 62 starters, beaten only by the five Ferrari 250GT’s and a Mercedes 300SL, big guns indeed . There were only another two Porsches entered, both of them 356 Carreras, so it is likely that the adjacent car is one of these.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5134

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A slightly battered 911 taking part in a rally whose date and location are as yet unknown.

  • #5138

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The Bastos name has been seen on countless racing and (perhaps more commonly) rally cars of widely differing makes. Various rallying 911’s carried their colours and at one time these were hauled to and from events on a trailer towed by a fully-livered Ford Granada estate, the roof of the Ford also carrying up to a dozen wheels. This ensemble made quite a sight.

    This is the 911SC/RS that the Belgian team used from 1984, another of those ‘regulation loophole’ models that Porsche have been so good at producing down the years. Based on the recently superseded 911SC, the car took advantage of the fact that when a homologated Group B model went out of production a further evolved version could be built amounting to 10% of the annual total required by the Group B rules. This allowed twenty such cars to be made, although a further example was constructed from spare parts at a later date.

    As Rothmans -already sponsoring the factory 956s- had asked Porsche for cars for their rally team, this competition special was the ideal candidate and a quarter of production went to them. One can be seen in Post#4975 above and the rest went to sponsored private teams that could afford the very stiff asking price, such as this one seen in Belgium on the 1984 Lotto Haspengouwrally. It was in the hands of its regular team of Snijers/Colebunders but they retired with an engine problem and while the rear bumper may have been torn off they have managed to retain the registration plate. Bastos was yet another tobacco company that gave motor sport considerable support in the days when it was still permissible to do so.

    Photo: Ted Ealker Archive

  • #5143

    Martin
    Keymaster

    An as yet unidentified French-registered 924 Carrera GT see on an unknown event in 1981.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5351

      Martin
      Keymaster

      A couple more shots of this car, apparently on the same event.

    • #5465

      Simon Puttick
      Participant

      I think this is the car of Marc Etchebers on the 1981 Rallye Maspalomas – a 924 Turbo transformed into a Carrera GT apparently, as he couldn’t afford the GTS – it worked well but lacked power so they went back to a 911 – info remembered (accurately hopefully) from Roy Smith’s 924 competition book

    • #5466

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Well remembered Simon, you’re absolutely right. The car came 5th on this tarmac event that took place in the Canary Islands and Etchebers had quite a career in rallying from 1967 to 1995, first using a Porsche in 1970 but rarely venturing outside Spain. His French wife navigated for him from 1970 to 1987 too.

      The car can be seen in these films of the rally here and here.

  • #5234

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Pictured on the 1981 Manx International Rally is the 911SC of Rohrl/Giestdörfer that retired with a driveshaft problem, Rohrl having been the 1980 World Rally Champion in a Fiat.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5352

      Martin
      Keymaster

      From the same event we see the car at a water splash and locking up under braking.

  • #5239

    Martin
    Keymaster

    It’s another wet day in Belgium on the 1981 Ypres Rally and who better to handle it than the experienced French crew Bernard Beguin/Jean-Jaques Lenne in their 911SC. On this occasion they came home 2nd overall and they were rallying together for ten years until 1988, although Beguin started competing internationally in 1974. He first used a 911 in 1976 and with a few breaks stuck with Porsche until 1985, that year as a member of the Rothmans team.

    Beguin won this event in a Porsche in 1979 and is happily still with us at 70. The rally, of 24 hours duration, is a tarmac event and note the hoods over the lower spot lamps, an apparently glare-reducing feature sometimes seen on snowy events like the Monte. The car (and another well-known 911) can be seen throughout this film of the event and note how cleanly he drives compared to some of the others.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5255

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Looking a little battered on the 1975 East African Safari Rally is the 911 of Bill Fritschy and Peter Moon. They did not trouble the results table that year, although Fritschy had won the event outright in a Mercedes in 1959 and 1960.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5264

    Martin
    Keymaster

    On a typically unforgiving Irish road and in equally unforgiving driving conditions we see this 911 on the 1981 Galway Rally. The car had been built in Germany in 1979 for the 1980 season but at the end of the year it was sold to a British driver to use the following season, buyer and seller being put in touch by one Walter Röhrl, a friend of the vendor! However, it was involved in a number of crashes during its year with its new owner, one of them bringing its competition career to a close.

    After a long period of inactivity it was bought -still in a damaged state- by someone else in Britain in 1999 and after rectification was then rallied for another ten years. In 2009 the owner got in touch with the original German owners/builders and having established its history restored it to its condition when first prepared in 1979 and it still competes in historic events today. Sponsor Heigo continue make roll cages and strut braces for many Porsches and other makes, by the way.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5391

    Martin
    Keymaster

    It is not clear if this 1980 924 was rallied by Jurgen Barth or just used for development.

    However, the stickers on the body would imply that it took part in competitive events.

    Either way, it seems to have had something of a hard life!

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5407

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Having come second (possibly in this very 911SC) the previous year, the French team of Vincent/Huret won the Rallye d’Antibes in 1981 in their Almeas-prepared car. They can be seen in this film of the event.

    The Eminence liveries suited these cars very well and here are a couple more in action. First we see Therier/Vial on the 1982 Rally de Portugal, where they retired with a suspension defect.

    Then, turning to the 1980 Monte Carlo Rally, this is Waldegard/Thorszelius, who went out after a gearbox failure.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5421

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Pictured in France, this is an as yet unidentified 904 on the 1966 Rallye des Routes du Nord. The car is caught passing a sign for the Lille MG, Mini-Cooper, Jaguar and Lotus dealer on an event than ran from 1951 to 1971, although it was revived in 2004.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5438

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Pictured in perhaps surprisingly damp conditions, this is the 911SC of Thérier/Vial on their way to victory in the 1980 Tour de Corse rally. It was the third (and so far last) time that a Porsche had won the event and the car and driver can be seen in this unfortunately rather poor quality film.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5475

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Destined to retire from the 1982 Rally de Portugal due to a suspension problem, this Almeras-prepared 911S of Thérier/Vial looks to be motoring strongly here.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5488

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Seen at the 1984 Acropolis Rally, this picture gives a good idea of the amount of support that was involved in running a top line rally team even in those days.

    Saeed Al-Hajri/John Spiller in action below during the above event, although they retired with a gearbox problem. The 911SC/RS models seen in these pictures were factory homologation specials, the team having taken five of the original twenty made. They were run on behalf of Rothmans by Prodrive, who further modified and developed them.

    Throwing up the dirt amid typical scenery on the 1985 Circuit of Ireland, Bernard Béguin/Jean-Jacques Lenne brought this car home in 4th.

    The team also contested the Middle East Rally Championship between 1984 and 1986 with a single car for Al-Hajri/Spiller. They are seen on their way to winning the 1986 Jordan Rally in a year when they finished second in the MERC, having won the title the two previous years.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5522

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Trying not to be too distracted by that rallying Rolls Royce(!) with its roof-mounted exhausts(!!), this scene comes from the 1970 London-Mexico World Cup Rally. A successor in long distance rallying to the 1968 London-Sydney Marathon, this event was sponsored by the Daily Mirror newspaper and covered 16,000 miles in just over a month, travelling around Europe and then through Central and South America, the cars being shipped across the Atlantic in two vessels.

    Pictured at an unknown stage on their travels, both of these cars failed to finish, being among the 80 retirements out of the 106 car field. All four of the 911’s taking part, which were privately entered, failed to complete the event and above we see the mount of UK entrants Terry Hunter/Geoff Mabbs. Their sponsors, the Swiss family company Bio-Strath, were also supporters of Swiss racing drivers Clay Reggazoni and Jo Siffert.

    • #5568

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Some film of the above event here showing the 911 pictured on a few occasions.

  • #5546

    Martin
    Keymaster

    On the 1975 Circuit Of Ireland Rally this is Dessie McCartney in his well-known Carrera RS Lightweight (#3600964), in which he finished second.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5576

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A selection of hard-cornering 911’s are seen in action on the Isle Of Man and in Ireland. While most of these cars still exist their competition careers brought about many changes of ownership, use, registration numbers, colours and even the parts of the world in which they have resided. Each one deserves to have its story told and we shall return to them, but for now here they are doing what they were designed to do, beginning (above) with the Carrera 2.7RS lightweight (#3601501) when in the ownership of Ian Corkill during 1977 and 1978.

    ^A Carrera 2.7RS lightweight (#3601101) when owned by Brian Evans between 1973 and 1976.

    ^This 930 was used between 1982 and 1984 by Manfred Hero.

    ^The Carrera 2.7RS lightweight (#3601359) used by Ken Shields/John McClean between 1974 and 1979.

    ^A sequence of shots showing John Price just escaping contact with a fence…

    ^…in a car yet to be identified…

    ^…but which is believed to be a 911SC…

    ^…which was also the registration that it once carried.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5657

      Martin
      Keymaster

      The above registration also appeared on a 911 hill climbed by Josh Sadler of Autofarm in the late 1970’s/early 1980’s. That was probably a different car though, with a sunroof, deep front spoiler and 928-type headlamps.

  • #5636

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Shown travelling at some speed on the sort of surface -not to mention the rocks and stone wall- that you might think twice about driving at speed in a 356B Carrera today, this is Paul Ernst Strӓhle and Herbert Linge on their way to winning the 1960 Tour de Course.

    Only 21 of the starters made it to the finish of this event, one that was usually dominated by French entries in those days.

    Photo: Porsche AG

  • #5701

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Waldegard/Thorszelius may not have been the highest-placed Porsche on the 1978 Safari Rally but they certainly tried, as we see here. Their drive only brought them a 4th place while Preston/Lyall in the other Martini-sponsored factory 911SC managed 2nd to a French-crewed Peugeot, although the Porsches were the only two car team to finish.

    The event took the cars 3000 miles in four days over terrain that was challenging in so many different ways. In fact, today’s Safari Classic Rally takes nine days to cover the same distance. The Martini colours have been applied to Porsches and other competition cars in various ways, but this must surely be one of the most effective.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5744

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Seen on the 1975 Galway Rally in the hands of David Agnew/Robert Harkness -where it finished 2nd- this is a car with a rather convoluted history. By the time of this picture it was already on its second bodyshell, as it had started out as a 911S/T-based prototype 2.8RSR (#9113600001) that the factory converted into a Group 4 rally car for the Pole Sobieslaw Zasada. He enjoyed two very successful periods of Porsche rallying in the 1960’s and 1970’s but had a big accident with this car in 1972 and that is how it came to be re-shelled as a Carrera RS (#9112300769). The factory retained the car for development work during the following year and the year after that it was sold to a British buyer as a rolling chassis with three engines, built up and then registered here. It is interesting to note that someone wrote (in English) on the invoice from Porsche for part of this transaction, ‘Too much, don’t pay’!

    It was sold to Agnew for the 1975-77 period and after further rallying it passed to Giroflex Porsche Championship sponsor and racer Chester Wedgewood. Subsequently converted into full 2.8RSR specification, it is now presented as a circuit racer/tarmac rally car and after living in the US now resides in France, appearing in historic events such as the Tour Auto and Le Mans.

    It is very much the nature of competition cars to sometimes be like an old hammer that has had its head and shaft replaced, perhaps each of them on more than one occasion!

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5769

    Mike Beattie
    Participant

    Is it right to say the car was reshelked as a RS as the car still had the ‘72 only” oil tank in front of the right hand rear wheel, so it was not a 2.7 RS shell?

     

  • #5770

    Martin
    Keymaster

    It is difficult to assess the condition of the car at the time of its Polish Rally accident, but the LH roof and side had certainly sustained quite a lot of damage. However, in the light of what you say perhaps it might be correct to state that it went back to the factory for repairs and conversion to 2.7RS Lightweight specification. The accident took place in mid-July and the car apparently arrived back at the works two months later. This would have been around the time that RS production was beginning, so it may be that some RS components were used to repair the existing shell, although why the car was renumbered -especially as it initially had a special 2.8L engine- is not clear. It may have related to homologation, as in its new guise it was apparently rallied again before being used as a development car during 1973.

  • #5771

    Mike Beattie
    Participant

    Martin, can you check the driver, I think it may be Sean Campbell with possibly his wife in the co-driver’s seat on the 77 Galway. The helmet colour and beard match Sean and certainly the co-driver does not look like Robert Harkness?

     

    • #5773

      Martin
      Keymaster

      I think that you’re right, Mike. We’ve actually got another shot taken at the same place on the same event, although the white paint of the Carrera has cause the flash to reflect a lot more than it did on the orange car. Derek Boyd/Rodney Cole took  No.14 to 8th on the 1977 Galway, so this bears out what you say.

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5772

    Mike Beattie
    Participant

    Martin

    Going back to the John Price SC, I have gone through Mark Copeland’s book on 911s in Irish rallying and this car belonged to Steve Carr of Autofarm, hence Josh Sadler then having the reg in his Hillclimb car. Carr then Kent the car to Dessie McCartney for his last Internationl event in a Porsche, the ‘78 Circuit. John Price then bought the car from Parr and did the Nanx before he transferred IIA 7700 onto it. Carr keeping 911SC.

  • #5774

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Thanks for sorting out the chronology of that one, Mike and thanks for your other inputs too. The fact that Irish rallying 911’s warrant their own book shows just how big (and sometime complicated) an aspect of Porsche history that this is.

  • #5777

    Mike Beattie
    Participant

    Martin, I suppose the fact that nearly all the 911s that rallied in GB appeared at some point or other on the rallies in this isle, is why the now out of print book is such a sought after item 🙂

    Would love to hear your thoughts on the Brian Nelson car and its auspicious history

    • #5779

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Coincidental that you should mention that one, Mike, as I was recently captioning a few pictures of it during his ownership.  When it comes to Porsches with a chequered history, that car (#9110301127) is certainly up there with the best of them!

      At the time that this picture was taken on the 1977 Circuit of Ireland Rally this 5th place finisher had been converted to RHD, wore the British 1971-72 registration number from a 911T and was being entered by Brian Nelson/Malcolm Neill as a Carrera RS. However, it is actually the very well-known ex-works 911S/T that Gerard Larrousse took to 3rd in the 1970 Tour de France Auto behind two Matra MS650’s(!), the first Porsche of fourteen in the top twenty. Memorable for being ultra-lightweight and for its rather psychedelic livery of yellow with red stripes, even its race numbers were initially in a unique and irregular style. Presumably the organisers objected to this and conventional numerals on white roundels were substituted.

      It became an out-and-out circuit racer and by the time that it reached Britain in 1974 it had already travelled about the world quite a bit and been returned to the factory for conversion from 2.4S/T to 2.8RSR specification. Here it was raced by David Purley (who had already graduated to F1) and well-known 911 competitors Nick Faure and John De Stefano, also turning up in the Brands Hatch 1000Km (above) towards the end of the year driven by French-sounding but apparently Greek “Asterix” and Raymond Touroul. They retired for mechanical reasons after starting 35th and last but Touroul had extensive experience with Porsches and Porsche-engined cars from the late 1960’s to the late 1990’s, including at Le Mans.

      The car was sold to Northern Ireland’s Brian Nelson the following year for tarmac rallying use and -where have we heard this before?!- was given the identity of another car (as mentioned in paragraph two) for tax avoidance reasons. Nelson was also a circuit racer and hill climber and on the circuits often competed in Crossle cars, also made in Northern Ireland and the oldest purely racing car manufacturer in the UK and possibly the world. He used the 911 with some success from at least 1976 to 1978 and its rallying career seems to have stretched over twelve years in his and other hands. It was eventually converted for road use and then spent a considerable amount of time laid up, but has now been meticulous returned to its 1970 TDF form. Above it is again seen during its alternative life when on the 1977 Donegal Rally, where it failed to finish although it had won the event the previous year. There can be nothing more contemporary than advertising carpet tiles, then something that was all the rage!

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5780

    Mike Beattie
    Participant

    Here’s one of it in RSR guise

     

    • #5781

      Martin
      Keymaster

      That looks to be on one of its earlier outings with Nelson, the 1976 Circuit Of Ireland where it crashed out. The frontal appearance is still much as it was for the Brands Hatch picture in Post#5779, although it has lost its competition indicator/grill assemblies in favour of normal horn grille/sidelight/indicator units. Ironically, as it was supposed to be a Carrera RS, the duck tail spoiler that it had at Brands has now been replaced with the flat type and other differences since it raced there are round instead of the streamlined mirror and Minilites replacing Fuchs’ on at least the front.

  • #5843

    Mike Beattie
    Participant

     

    Another photo from Billy Patterson’s Collection, I suspect taken by his father. The event is the Circuit of Ireland and the venue is Bangor Castle Park in Co. Down. In the early 60’s before the event went fully over to Special Stages, the last test was a Braking Test, where the cars accelerated and then had to brake into a curving “garage” of tins, with penalties being time and any penalties incurred by striking any of the tins.

     

    Anyhow here is an unknown 356, probably from GB, anyone recognise the reg Nr?

     

     

    • #5844

      Martin
      Keymaster

      I think that it is often overlooked that the Circuit Of Ireland is one of the oldest-established rallies in the world, beginning in 1931. Those paint tins remind me of the oil cans that were used to mark out some of the corners when Silverstone first opened in 1948 and the 356B of 1959-60 wears some rather unusual streamlined wing mirrors.

      That registration is interesting though, G having been issued in Glasgow between 1903 and some time prior to 1921 and so it had become a personal number by the time of this picture.  It was attached to a Marcos GT for the 1961 and 1962 seasons, bought new by wealthy young Glasgow enthusiast Barry Filer and driven for him by a then-unknown Scot whose family business -Jaguar dealers Dumbuck Garage- he used, one Jackie Stewart.

      Filer was not allowed to race by his family and having had other drivers race and sometimes damage his cars he offered Stewart the chance to compete in his Super 90 as he was the one maintaining it. He came 2nd first time out and won on the next occasion, so perhaps the car pictured is that car shortly before all this took place? G128 is still carried by the Marcos (now in Italian ownership) for historical reasons, in the same way that the ex-Dickie Stoop 904 carries YOU 4, although today it is registered to a 2010 VW.

  • #5846

    Mike Beattie
    Participant

    Great info Martin.

    My father’s Austin 7 Mulliner Sports took part in the 1930 Ulster Reliability Trial, whose success lead to the UAC expanding the event to cover more of the island and become the Circuit of Ireland. The event gained greater profile from the 1950’s when it attracted the top crews from across the British Isles. It relied on tight navigation sections, Autotests ( often held at road junctions) and speed tests which were usually hillclimbs, the roads were not officially closed, but any local who happened on a test would be asked to wait a minute or two until the next competing car had finished !) In 1963 the first of the Special Stages was brought in (Drumkeeragh Forest Co Down) and from 1964 it became a full stage rally closed roads but still with tight road navigation with no time set aside for servicing. As it always clashed with the East African Safari, both held over the Easter period, while the Circuit became part of the ERC it never made to the top level of world rallying.

    Here’s another Circuit 356 to be identified

    Again this will be a GB car as I am not aware of any local 356s being rallied, though several did hillclimbs and races.

    The first Irish entry for a 911 was in 1969 by Dublin fur trader Cecil Vard, who had competed in the Monte back in the 50’s in Jaguars. Here he is with Paul Phelan in the 1971 Circuit with Paul Phelan, this was the first year when several 911s started the event.  If you watch the film ‘ A Dash of the Irish’ the camera car, driven by one P Hopkirk, follows Vard through part of a stage

     

    • #5847

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Thanks for the background on the event, Mike. I always felt it to be one of the world’s great tarmac rallies, the often narrow and undulating roads calling for real skill in avoiding any contact with the scenery. While the 911S in your picture appears to be accomplishing this perfectly the 356 has unfortunately suffered a small impact. If others would like to see the film that Mike mentions it can be found here, a great record of the event that year.Despite the shock absorbers mentioned by Paddy Hopkirk the 911 finished 8th overall and look out too for another famous Irish rallying 911, the 2.2ST COI 6, among the other Porsches taking part.

      Vard, motoring correspondent of the Sunday Independent newspaper, had a rather varied motorsport career embracing not only the events already mentioned but also autotests and racing. He even had an outing at Le Mans in 1955 for the Frazer Nash team, although he only got to practice as the engine expired on lap 34 of the race, before his first stint. In an apocryphal story too good not to repeat, the Jaguar Mk5 in which he contested his first Monte (starting from Glasgow) was apparently borrowed from his future mother-in-law on the pretext of taking it on a continental tour, something which was in essence true! Due to his dual motorsport and charitable interests he is probably unique among those that we mention in these pages in having trophies awarded in his memory for rallying and for a senior citizens talent competition! Co-driver Phelan went on the win the Circuit with Billy Coleman four years later.

      The Dublin registration of the 911 doesn’t ring any bells with me but the 1963 Middlesex mark of the 356B seems vaguely familiar, so does anyone know anything more about these cars?

      • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by  Martin. Reason: Additional information
  • #5867

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The additional spot lamps do not do much for the looks of this works 906 (#006) of Klass/Wutherich, shown here on the 1964 Tour de France Auto where they came 4th overall. This car had an active 1964 which had already encompassed the Targa Florio (2nd), the Nurburgring 1000Km (12th) and Le Mans (10th), so I think that these four events show just what a versatile car the 904 was and what a reliable one too.

    The TdF was an interesting combination of various motor sport disciplins, encompassing circuit races, hill climbs and special tests, initially on tarmac and gravel from its revival in 1951 and from 1960 solely on tarmac. It allowed drivers and cars from the worlds of rallying and racing to compete equally and the 1964 event pictured here lasted nine days, with only 36 of the 117 starters finishing. Beginning at Lille that year and finishing in Nice it incorporated visits to the Clermont-Ferrand, Le Mans, Pau, Reims, Rouen and even Monza circuits, some of which can be seen in this film, along with a few Porsches. The event, which had its origins in one first staged in 1899, was often a Ferrari benefit overall despite attempts to make it favour no particular type of car and there were six GT and six Touring classes in 1964, the car pictured coming second in its class and contributing to a 904 class 1-2-3-4.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

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