Speed Events – Non-UK

This topic contains 13 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Martin 6 days, 1 hour ago.

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  • #4256

    Martin
    Keymaster

    As we sometimes feature drivers who died at an early age it is pleasing to see this picture of the German driver Joseph ‘Sepp’ Greger in a 906 (possibly #127) at the Gaisburg hill climb in 1967. As well as living to over 95 he enjoyed a long motorsport career, beginning with motorcycles pre-war before moving on to cars in 1950 and finally giving up competitive driving at the age of 75 after taking part in something like 1200 events. He raced nationally and internationally in many Porsches and even Porsche powered Elva and KMW models. He took part in numerous hill climbs in addition to this one, Gaisberg being an Austrian public road venue used from 1929 to 1969 although the course has been used since 2003 as part of a classic car regularity event.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This topic was modified 10 months, 3 weeks ago by  Martin.
  • #4322

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This picture was apparently taken at Ardmore, New Zealand in 1958, so this 1955 356 pre-A was still fairly new. The exact location and occasion are unknown, although the car is kitted out for light competition work, with the front lights taped over and the hubcaps removed. Rallying in NZ didn’t begin until the mid-1960’s, so presumably this was a circuit race or -more likely in view of the dust down the side- a hill climb. These often took place on unmade roads in NZ and some still do today.

    A Cooper-Porsche was NZ hill climb champion twice in the 1960’s (the series began in 1956) and there is still a thriving motorsport scene in New Zealand today, just as there was when our picture was taken. In fact, returning to the Ardmore connection, the NZ GP was held at the Ardmore airfield circuit from 1954 to 1962, although the first NZ road race was held in Orakei in 1933.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 10 months, 3 weeks ago by  Martin.
  • #4325

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This 718 looks to be pressing on at the 1961 Freiburg-Schauinsland hill climb, with the nearside rear wheel tucked well into the wheelarch and the offside front tyre almost breaking contact with the track. The hill was the longest used in Germany at 12000m and ascended almost 800m over its distance.  It was the scene of a number of Porsche victories, although I know nothing of this car and driver.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 10 months, 3 weeks ago by  Martin.
    • #5343

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Replies to this post appear below the next two pictures.

  • #4988

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Two views from the German Eberbach hill climb in 1965, a course where Porsche driver and later team owner Reinhold Joest started his driving career. As was -and is- usual on these continental hill climbs they took place on closed public roads with all their attendant dangers and the 356 and 904 kick up the dust on one of the corners.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5331

      Simon Puttick
      Participant

      according to the Euromontagna website the driver was Karl Orthuber in a car listed as a “1600 RS” – presumably that means a 718 RS 60 or 61 – are they’re any real external differences between them or is it all under the skin?

    • #5342

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Whereas the RS60 differed from the RSK, there were no differences on the surface or even under the skin between the RS60 and the RS61. Having given the car an age-related name, I guess that the factory felt that they had to rename it for the new season, so its new title was effectively just a piece of marketing.

    • #5395

      Simon Puttick
      Participant

      judging from the registration number the 904 is Udo Schutz in chassis 036 – according to the reference material I have available he finished second in the GT category

      and again going by the registration the 356 Carrera should be Sepp Greger

       

    • #5396

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Thanks for identifying these two, Simon. Schutz and Greger have lots of Porsche history, especially the latter who also raced one of the Porsche-powered KMW interserie cars.

  • #5037

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The registration number BL29 belongs to Swiss competitor Heini Walter and turns up on various Porsches. He was active with this 718RSK (likely to be #029) in the late 1950s and early 1960s in a variety of events and is seen here about to leave the line at an unknown hill climb, although that lady with the camera has spotted something more interesting!

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5045

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A scene that might be in Britain given the Morris Oxford in the background and the RHD 356B or C, but this was actually taken at a speed event on the New Zealand coast. The condition of the road surface provides something of a contrast with that normally found at such events in Europe and this is presumably a closed public road.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5292

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A rare 904-8 in the hands of Herbert Muller is captured at the Freiburg hill climb in 1964, the extreme suspension deflection and the OSF wheel almost breaking contact with the road surface indicating a spirited drive.

    Freiburg-Schauinsland, to give it its full title, was active for almost 50 years from 1925 and ascends from 400 to 1200m above sea level over its 12km. It encompassed 127 corners(!), although by the time of our picture its length had been slightly reduced to 11.2km.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5478

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The southern French Mont Ventoux hill climb ran on fifty occasions between 1902 and 1976, rising over 5000 feet along its 13 miles of closed public road.

    Porsches were successful there on a number of occasions, including the one pictured. It shows Jean Behra winning the 1958 event in his 718RSK, his time of just over 12 minutes having been reduced to just over six minutes by the time that the final event was held eighteen years later.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5859

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The Freiburg hill climb in 1959 and the 718RSK (#026) of Wolfgang Seidel is caught cornering hard during the long ascent. He came 4th out of the 718RSK’s that filled the top five places, the car subsequently globe-trotting to the Bahamas, South America and Central Southern Africa. A worthy successor to the 550, the 718 was a particularly successful as a hill climb car -winning the European Mountain Championship four seasons in a row- as well as winning on the circuits. It also spawned some useful derivatives, including the eight cylinder WRS and GTR variants along with the single-seaters used in F2 and ultimately F1.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

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