Circuits – UK

This topic contains 64 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Martin 1 month ago.

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  • #4228

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A factory 910 (#028) with the unusual pairing of Jo Siffert/Bruce McLaren dives inside the Ferrari 250LM of Prophet/de Klerk under braking at Brands Hatch during the 1967 BOAC 500. The 910 had started from 8th and finished 3rd overall and in its class to a Chaparral and a Ferrari, two laps in arrears. McLaren had a lot of sports racing car drives during his career, often in his eponymous models and so this was a rare one-off with Porsche.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4231

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A very wet day at the races during a PCGB/BF Goodrich Championship round. The location looks to be Silverstone and the amount of water coming off the tyres of Mike Walker’s 911 gives a good indication of how treacherous the driving conditions must have been.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5393

      Simon Puttick
      Participant

      the Eurotech car in 1988 or 1989 perhaps?

    • #5397

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Yes, certainly the Eurotech car, although I’d say 1989/90 during the B F Goodrich period of championship sponsorship. Here’s a picture of the car on a drier occasion, but at an unknown location which doesn’t look to be a conventional circuit given the kerb visible on the right.

      The car seen with its driver, Mike Walker of Bristol and wearing a different sunstrip.

      Photos: Ted Walker archive

  • #4234

    Martin
    Keymaster

    In June 1965 a 904 (#092) is seen when testing at Castle Combe. Having previously been owned by Carel de Beaufort this car was by then in the hands of Pat Godfrey, who used it at home and abroad before selling it to Alain de Cadenet. The car may have moved around the world a bit since the picture was taken but I think that the building behind it is still there.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5447

      Ted
      Participant

      Yes its the Tavern Café now.Very good bacon sandwiches !!!!!

  • #4994

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The Boeri Helmets Racing Team 917/10 (#016) was finished in a distinctive green and it is seen here at Silverstone for the Martini Interational Super Sports race, the third round of the 1973 Interserie Championship. Driver Ernst Kraus qualified the car in 6th position and finished 4th in both heats making it a 917/10 top four that day.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4995

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Tony Wingrove was a well-known 911 competitor during the 1970’s. Both shots were taken at Mallory Park, this one in October 1978 during an STP Modsports Championship round. The car is the 911 RSR 2.8 that he also used at the Silverstone Six Hours a few month before this.

    Rounding rather than approaching the Mallory hairpin as seen above and two years before the previous shot, this time we see Wingrove in a what appears to be a very nice (and then still fairly new) 911 Carrera RS wearing a very fetching set of Minilite wheels, one of two examples of this model that he raced. This car appears to still exist, although these days it is on its original wheels.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5357

      Simon Puttick
      Participant

      anyone know the colour of the Carrera script on the sides of the #6 car above – it would be a pretty simple one to do in 1/43 scale – apart from modifying it to RHD of course

    • #5470

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Can’t help with the colour of the script, but here’s another picture of his RSR that I’ve just come across, taken at an STP Modsports Championship round at Oulton Park in 1978.

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4998

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The fearsome Kremer-developed 935 K4 (#K4 01) of Fitzpatrick/Hobbs/Wollek is seen at the top of Pilgrims Rise as it turns into Druids at Brands Hatch during the 1982 1000Km race. The car qualified 11th but rose to finish 3rd, ahead of a block of seven Group C cars that included both of the works Ford C100s! The speed and reliability of the 935 was never to be underestimated, constant development by Kremer and others keeping it abrest -and often ahead of- the competition. This came at some cost though, with a K4 costing DM400,000 in 1981.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #4999

    Martin
    Keymaster

    We don’t always get the chance to see a 917 in action from the rear, so here is such a picture. Taken at the 1970 BOAC 1000 at Brands Hatch and presumably in practice as it was a very wet race, this is the 917K (#020) of Porsche Salzburg. Driven by Attwood/Herrmann it finished 3rd from its grid 8th and note that the American Porsche+Audi lettering had the latter make taped over, presumably due to the different distribution arrangements prevailing in Britain.

    The car had last raced at Sebring a few weeks before, hence this US market signage still being present and the Audi part was completely removed for subsequent European races, leaving Porsche oddly offset on the nose. This livery used by Austrian Porsche team -which had works support in parallel with the JW-Gulf organisation- appeared in a number of variations including the reverse of the way in which it is applied here and most famously the red/white version used on the No.23 Le Mans winner. It was a scheme that suted these cars particularly well.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5033

    Martin
    Keymaster

    After showing one of the ultimate 935 developments in post#4998 above, these two pictures taken from the same spot at the 1980 Silverstone Six Hours allow us to compare a brace of contrasting earlier examples. First we have this 935/77A (#9308900012) of Schornstein/Grohs that finished 5th from a grid 9th. The car began racing with the Kremer team very early in 1977 and was one of a number of cars built by Porsche for private entrants and based on the original 935 from the previous year. As can be seen from this and the following picture…

    …a certain amount of evolution had taken place by the time that Kremer built this 935K3 (#0090003) in 1979. Among those who chose to develope the model to seek an advantage over the factory and other teams, Kremer were in the vanguard of those carrying out this work. Based on their earlier efforts at improving on the original car the K3 was one of the most well-known derivatives, although there was also the later K4. In this instance Doran/Lassig/Holup took this car to 6th from a grid 11th and note how flatly the car is sitting on the track compared to the 934 behind it.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5051

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Not just another hard-charging 911 as you might at first think, this car -pictured at Donington in 1979 when it was driven by Nigel Hulme- has quite a history. Despite its 1971 number plate (when it was first registered in the UK) it is actually a 1968 911T/R (#11820884), the first customer competition 911 model available from the factory and as well as being one of only 28 made there were only three others that were supplied in RHD form.

    The car was raced at home and as far afield as South Africa from the outset, scored a class second on the 1970 Targa Florio and it practiced for Le Mans in 1971, although being involved in an accident during qualifying prevented it taking the place on the grid that it had already secured. The car was also successfully rallied (as 2 BRX) during the 1980’s and 1990’s before a full restoration was carried out in 2012.  The ‘Home Tune’ advertising on the car is a very period feature too. This mobile engine tuning franchise was established in 1968 and had 150 operators at its peak, although being rooted in the days of carburettors and distributors it ceased to exist in 2003.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5074

    Martin
    Keymaster

    At Silverstone we see a JW 917 testing, pre- or post season to judge by the partially blanked off cooling intake.

    Conditions look pretty murky that day, hence the need for a bit of screen cleaning.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5088

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Attracting an understandably large amount of attention in the Silverstone pit lane on its debut outing in 1978 is the 935/78 (#006) popularly known as Mody Dick. In one of the greatest pieces of rule interpretation ever, the factory built this special 935 to take full advantage of the regulations with an eye particularly towards Le Mans, although it was at this meeting that the car was most successful, winning from pole in the hands of Mass/Ickx. With its 3.2L engine using water cooled cylinder heads it was massively powerful as well as being light and aerodynamically effective and on this occasion the car was lapping Silverstone at approaching the F1 speeds of the day!

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5091

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This pair of pictures appear to be of the same model, although while they look similar nothing could be further from the truth. Here is the pole-setting 936/78 (#001) at the 1979 Silverstone Six Hours, although in the hands of Redman/Mass it did not have such a good race and was out due to an accident just over thirty laps from the end. Its distance covered was still good enough to give it 10th place and these cars looked good in their white+red/blue Essex livey.

    At first glance you might think that the car below is a later version of the preceding 936 as it is pictured at the same event two years later. However, it is actually a 908 (80-004), although one that had been considerable modified in most respects by Joest. After the factory had decided to dispose of its 908’s almost ten years earlier they found willing buyers among the private teams and some -like Joest- carried on developing them during the 1970’s, also incorporating the influence of the 936 when that was released later in the decade. The car pictured was by now running a 2.1 twin turbo F6 engine instead of the normally aspirated 3.0 F8 with which it had started out and had vastly different bodywork to the original.

    These 908/80 models (as Joest called them) were still being successful, this car having come second at Le Mans the year before. Unfortunately, such a performance eluded it on this occasion, as after starting from pole Jochen Mass had an accident on the wet first lap, although another much-developed 908/3 of Siggi Brunn came home third.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5092

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The only name visible on this 962C (#133) is that of entrant/driver Jochen Dauer, although ironically he did not get a drive in this race as after qualifying 14th co-driver Will Hoy retired having not even completing one lap due to an accident. The occasion was the Brands Hatch World Sports Prototype round in 1989 and by then it was most unusual to see an unsponsored car at this level of racing.

    The Dauer Racing team carried on for a couple more years and then spent a further two years developing their 962-based road car, the 962 Le Mans, which had a sporadic five year production life of about twelve examples. The company received assistance from Porsche with that project and it may have been at their behest that Dauer modified two of the production 962 Le Mans models to become racing cars again as contenders in the new GT class at Le Mans in 1994.  The Joest-run cars finished the race in 1st and 3rd positions in a marvellous piece of loophole exploitation and regulation changes were implemented to prevented the possibility of it happening again the following year!

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5095

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Three shots of 356’s in action at Silverstone, beginning with this quite new pre-A from 1955 driven by Brian Naylor (yes, he’s in there somewhere, it’s not driverless!). At that time the circuit still used old oil cans as markers, as it had done when it opened in the previous decade.

    An interesting 1956 study in Ford, Triumph and MG body roll compared to that of an again fairly new pre-A. Of course, we don’t know anything about their respective speeds, although we can surmise that the Porsche is taking a wide line to pass the others rather than being overtaken by the Ford 100E!

    Alan Smith, here in a 1959 356A Carrera 1.6, is pictured at a Bentley Drivers Club race meeting. This car was also raced by Porsche Cars GB Director Peter Bulbeck while in Alan’s ownership and is still on the road, although now painted silver.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5571

      Martin
      Keymaster

      The above car is seen again at Silverstone in 1968 during one of the popular Eight Clubs meetings. On this occasion the weather was not being too kind to A C Smith, here appropriately being pursued by an AC of Mike Fulford, a Bristol-engined Ace. The date is thought to be June 1st, as you can tell from the British Summer climate!

      At this point the car sported a different front bumper, with overriders and cut-outs.

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Martin. Reason: Additional information from Tony Bancroft
  • #5098

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Porsche sent two 718/2s to the 1960 Aintree 200 F2 Championship race, this one (#03) of Graham Hill (with helmet at left) coming home 3rd behind that of Jo Bonnier (with helmet at right). The overall winner was also a Porsche, Stirling Moss taking the Rob Walker car -loaned by the factory for the season- to victory. In the championship that year these drivers respectively came 7th, 3rd and 5th and Porsche was the top manufacturer.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5130

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Earstwhile Porsche/Ferrari/Lamborghini dealer Chris Maltin is seen at Castle Combe in August 1968 beside an interesting 911 on trade plates. I believe that this car is the famous GVB 911D in its later British Saloon Car Championship guise, the car that Vic Elford used to great effect in that first rallycross meeting at Lydden Hill and which today is back to its original 1966 appearance.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5136

    Martin
    Keymaster

    In the traditional German racing colours of white with red numbers, this 907 (#021) is the car that Jochen Neerpasch practiced as a T-car for the 1968 BOAC 500 at Brands Hatch, unfortunately having an accident with it during one of the sessions. The other three works 907’s destined to take part part in the race wore black numbers and had identifying coloured panels on their noses and it was in one of these that Neepasch took 3rd place in partnership with Vic Elford.

    It is interesting to speculate on when the last appearance internationally of the traditional German number/colour combination might have been, as this may have been it. The fact that this car carries No.2 here is rather confusing, as this was allocated to Jo Bonnier’s Lola at the meeting. Not for the first time is a car pictured at a circuit wearing the number from a previous appearance!

    The 907 had a short career with the factory, although subsequently in private hands the model raced into the mid-1970s. Designed for long distance events, it was lightly used during the 1967 and 1968 seasons and was eclipsed by the regulation changes that brought about the 917.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5183

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The 1966 RAC TT was held at Oulton Park and this 906 (#129) was entered by Porsche Cars GB, finishing a creditable 6th overall from a grid 9th. Mike de Udy was also down to drive, but in the event only Peter de Klerk took the wheel, seen here running a little off course as he concentrates on the interior mirror and the 3rd place Peter Sutcliffe  GT40 which is about to pass.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5205

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Apparently shown at Brands Hatch in 1969, this rather battered 911 with a roll cage carries an appropriate word across its front lid. It would be interesting to know more about the circumstances of this picture.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5363

      Simon Puttick
      Participant

      Sven Engstrom in his 911S at the Brands Hatch Motor Show on 19/10/69 – don’t know about the damage but he finished 8th o/all – info courtesy of the excellent touringcarracing.net website – well worth a visit, lots of Porsche pictures

    • #5365

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Thanks for the background on this one. The slide had 19/12/69 written on it, which I thought couldn’t be right, so it was just a slip of someone’s pen all those years ago. Engstrom did well to finish that high in a field that included a lot of big names and starting halfway down the grid of 35 wasn’t bad either.

      Did he really come all the way from Denmark just for the Motor Show 200 (the final round of the British Saloon Car Championship)? Perhaps he was looking for a new challenge, having been Danish touring car champion two years running with the car. Smash, appropriate though it is in this instance, was a brand of lemonade!

      Looking at the car again, it has an unusually flared rear wheelarch which initially looked to be part of the panel damage.

  • #5209

    Martin
    Keymaster

    With the veteran Silverstone rescue team Land Rover and (just visible) Jaguar in the background -both a familiar sight at the circuit for many years- this is the virtually unsponsored 934 (#9306700169) of Italian entrant Capofelli Engineering at the 1977 Silverstone Six Hours. Driven by Capra/”Archimede”/Gottifredi -there was probably some statute that required all Italian racing teams to have at least one driver racing under a nickname!- the car finished 12th from a grid 16th in a field that encompassed cars from an MGB to a works 935/77 (which won).

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5231

    Martin
    Keymaster

    While the factory did not consider the 924 to have any racing potential at that stage -although that was soon to change- Porsche Cars GB decided to run a race series for the car over the 1978 season. Only introduced into the UK in March 1977, it was perhaps felt that the car required some sporting credentials to counteract the negative views of some rear-engined Porsche enthusiasts and to generally raise its public profile a little, although in the main the reaction to the car had been positive.

    Here we see Any Rouse, a man well known in touring car racing circles, pressing on at Snetterton in July 1978 after a delayed start in a car sponsored by Porsche dealers Heddell & Deeks of Bournemouth. Each car in the championship was run by a dealer and H&D, who also sold Jaguars, became Chapelgate and then in the mid-2000s metamorphosed into an OPC, as did various other established Porsche franchise holders. Rouse scored some good results but eventually finished second to Tony Dron in the series.

    The cars were allowed few modifications above safety equipment, racing tyres and lowering the suspension, although this car also sports some brake cooling ducts. While the engines remained standard they were blueprinted and so with all of the cars to the same specification and a line-up of experienced drivers close racing (often to the point of exchanging paint!) was the order of the day. Unfortunately the series was a victim of the success of the car and as such publicity was no longer deemed necessary due to strong sales the championship only ran for that one year. Some of the cars continued to race elsewhere though and at least two have survived.

    One of these, the championship-winning Tony Dron car (restored in 2017 to its 1978/9 condition) had an interesting post-924 Championship moment. Sponsored by the then Newcastle Porsche dealer, it became the only standard 924 to take part in a World Sports Car Manufacturers Championship round -although Peter Lovett/Peter Richmond had unsuccessfully tried to qualify one in the Silverstone Six Hours the previous year- and the car is pictured above on that very occasion.

    That event was the 1979 Brands Hatch Six Hours, where it was driven by Win Percy and Juliette Slaughter. It qualified 32nd (six seconds behind the penultimate car on the grid) but finished 22nd, beating a BMW by three laps along with another nine cars that were either not classified or did not finish. It also won its class, but only by virtue of being the only starter! Juliette Slaughter had raced a Lola at Le Mans the previous year, at that time being only the second British woman to compete there post-war.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5236

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A precursor of his successful Canon-liveried 956, this is Richard Lloyd’s 924 Carrera GTR (#BS70006), at that time entered by his GTI Engineering company prior to his establishing Richard Lloyd Racing, Pictured at the 1981 Silverstone Six Hours, he shared the car with Tony Dron and came 11th from a grid position of 24.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5253

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Here is a short selection from the Porsche Club Championship race supporting the Birmingham Superprix in 1988. This street circuit just south of the city centre was used between 1986 and 1990 and first we see the 928S of Serge Davis, the 928 never being a popular model on the tracks.

    Next is the 944 Turbo entered by Porsche Cars GB for none other than 1970 Porsche Le Mans winner Richard Attwood, who finished 5th.

    Finally the 911 Carrera 2.7 of Keith Russell, cornering hard as he passes the local Ford dealer. Russell was running 3rd in the Championship at this point but could only manage a 4th in class that day after a collision with another competitor.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

     

  • #5258

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Castle Combe in 1985 and this 911 has had to stop on the paddock slip road for obvious reasons.

    The picture also serves as a reminder of the days before the centre of the track was filled with solar panels.

    Photo: Graham West

  • #5287

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The Porsche Club Great Britain began its motorsport championship with two trophies awarded to the members who were the most successful competitors in ‘old’ and ‘modern’ Porsches in whatever races they chose to enter. By 1984 there was a tentative series of six races for production models and the following year a proper championship began. For the 1987 and 1988 seasons Pirelli were the series sponsor, B F Goodrich taking over for 1989 and 1990 and it is from these periods that this selection of pictures is taken.

    An interesting group of nowadays very expensive 911’s doing what came naturally at that time.

    It is notable to see some front-engined models making inroads into the 911-dominated grid here.

    This looks to be a genuine 930SE – or is it a Dage Sport conversion?

    The AFN 928 was not the only example of this rarely-raced model to compete in the championship.

    I remember Castrol Syntron X as being their entry into the synthetic oil market in 1987 and heavily promoted, as here.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5290

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The picture gives an excellent impression of speed, the tail down/nose up attitude implying some acceleration is taking place.

    It shows an Austrian 910 (#001) making a rare visit to Snetterton in 1970 for Round One of the RAC Sports Car Championship.  Lambert Hofer was the usual driver of this Bosch Racing Team Vienna car and he qualified 14th and came in 7th. The car raced again at Thruxton three days later, taking advantage of the fact that it was the Easter weekend. There were another two British-entered 910s in the Snetterton race, but it was a Chevron-dominated affair.

    With the car cornering hard, from this angle we can appreciate just how big those front winglets were and how easy it must have been to damage them.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5340

    Martin
    Keymaster

    By the 1984 Silverstone 1000Km the 935 was getting a bit long in the tooth for international racing, but there were still some being campaigned and this one raced on into 1986. On this occasion this car (#9308900017) qualified 36th and finished 22nd (and last) in the hands of the all-Italian crew of ‘Victor’ (the entrant, Vittorio Coggiola)/Mussato/Giudici, although they did win the GTX Class as the only other competitor failed to start.

    While this was the only 935 to make the race it still has an impressive presence in this later form. It had started out as a 935/77A version back in 1978 but by this time had undergone some considerable body and mechanical evolution.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5398

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This is Richard Clear’s 934 (#9306700155) that he shared with David Kennedy in the Flying Tiger 1000km WEC race at Brands Hatch in 1981. Although qualifying 25th they finished 12th in what might best be described as a rather mixed field -one that was peppered with 935’s- and were second in class to a 924 Carrera GTR, 29 laps down on the overall winner (a Lola T600). This car had quite a competition history and raced widely in Clear’s and various other hands between 1978 and 1982.

    I feel that the 934 gets rather overlooked these days, overshadowed by the 911 RSR and the 935. It was only made for two years and was a racing version of the 930, it distinctive wheelarch extensions giving it a look all of its own. Here are some more 934’s in action on British circuits, beginning with two at the Silverstone Six Hours in 1977. First up is the French entry (#9306700177) of Ballot-Lena/Lafosse/Dagoreau, which finished 13th from a grid 10th.

    Next we have the Italian Jolly Club entry of Brambilla/Moretti (#9306700167), sponsored by the Momo concern of the latter driver, which won the GT class and came 7th overall from a grid 8th.

    Turning to the Brands Hatch Six Hours in 1979 we see the car (#9306700155) entered by Swede Kenneth Leim for himself and Lella Lombardi, which improved to finish 16th from a grid 23rd.

    Back at Silverstone for the Six Hours in the same year we see the Leim car again, this time with some different sponsorship and being shared with Kurt Simonsen. They were rewarded with 8th place from a grid 16th.

    Staying at Silverstone but moving on a year to the 1980 Six Hours we see the ASA Cachia car again, now in the hands of another French team. Entered and driven by Christian Bussi with the assistance of Jaques Guerin and Phillipe Alliot, it came home 10th from a grid 25th.

    Finally and moving ahead to 1983 we find the Mid-Kent Racing example (#9306700154) competing in a Brands Hatch Thundersports meeting, one of two such outings that it had there that year.

    These appearances are really only scratching the surface of the 934’s racing career and you will note all of the above cars finished their races. To close, here is another shot of the ASA Cachia car at Silverstone in 1977 which shows its eye-catching livery to advantage.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5408

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This 910 (#017) entered by John L’Aime for himself and Tommy Reid did quite well in the 1970 BOAC 1000Km. Starting from 25th they finished 9th and also won their class, not a bad result at all for two privateers against some top international works competition.

    In fact, the factory Ferrari 512S seen behind them could only manage 13th. Note too those very small front wheelarch extensions, which were not on the car when it was with any of its previous German owners.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5428

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Still racing at this stage but destined to retire with distributor trouble, this is the Hone/Morris 904 during a torrential Ilford 500 at Brands Hatch in 1966. The pursuing TVR didn’t finish either on what looks to have been a rather miserable occasion, although for the entrants there was the compensation of £50 starting money, not a bad amount in those days.

    In another shot from the same race the two protagonists are still at it, joined by an E-type that made it to the end in 19th place

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5448

      Ted
      Participant

      The E type car 10 was driven by my long term friend John Harper who is still racing this season aged 79 !!

    • #5450

      Martin
      Keymaster

      I think that John shared this 911 Carrera RS 3.0 with John Beasley in a couple of British endurance races in 1979, the Brands Hatch Six Hours in this instance. They finished 11th from a grid 21st.

      One more picture of the Hone/Morris 904 (#097) during the Ilford 500, with John Morris at the wheel pursued by a Lotus Elan and a Morgan Plus 4.

      Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5451

      Ted
      Participant

      Yes that’s john in thePorsche, He and John Beasley were BAT Motors

    • #5452

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Beasley had previously raced Simon Philips’ 911 Carrera RSR (and his Lola at Le Mans). I believe that 2018 marks Harper’s 55th racing season!

    • #5453

      Martin
      Keymaster

      This is the RSR (#4609075) that Beasley raced, referred to in the above post. On the occasion of this picture, the 1979 Silverstone Six Hours, he was sharing the RS seen in Post#5050 with Harper again. They unfortunately retired with an engine problem while the RSR finished 11th.

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5538

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Here is a colour picture of the 911 in Post#5450.

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5442

    Martin
    Keymaster

    While there were works Porsches competing in the 1968 BOAC 500 at Brands Hatch, here is the 906 (#133) of Jeff Edmunds which he entered for himself and Chris Ashmore. Their grid 23rd translated into a 21st place finish, although they were not running at the end due to an engine problem. This car had quite a career, starting in America and finishing in Angola and has slightly modified rear wheel arches

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5469

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Wearing some very 1970’s decoration against its black paintwork, this Cachia-prepared car was entered in the 1979 Brands Hatch Six Hours as a 911SC 2.8, but it looks more like a 934 to me with those flaps in the front lid and the angular wheelarch extensions.

    The French team of entrant Gerard Bleynie, Jacques Guerrin and Jean-Louis Schlesser finished 13th from a grid 14th and 6th in the GT division.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5479

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Seen at Silverstone during the 2.0/GT division of the 1966 Martini Trophy, this well-known Irish Green 906 (#101) was the first of the production series and supplied to Porsche Cars Great Britain for Mike de’Udy’s use, although he subsequently had his own 906 (#129) in the same colour.

    Winning on this occasion, the car was lightly raced before passing into the ownership of Gerry Tyack (see Speed Events – UK; Post#4319) for a year of speed events when it was refinished in white. It then found its way to America and through the hands of seven owners, ultimately spending a long period in virtual abandonment. Rescued and returned to Europe where it was restored, it can again be seen in action in Britain after this extensive work and has also clocked up a considerable road mileage.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

    • #5481

      Ted
      Participant

      My friend Julian Majub has owned this car for a long time and is getting it going for next season

    • #5485

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Ted, I think that Julian’s 906 is the ex-Bill Bradley (Midland Racing Partnership) #144 that he used from the mid- to late-1960’s. It was white with a light blue stripe and Bradley converted it to RHD although its next driver, Richard Shardlow (Worcester Racing Association), changed the colours to blue with a white stripe. He used in 1969 and 1970 and it may well be the car pictured in Pit & Paddock Post#4962. It was still blue when Mike Coombe (Opposite Lock Club) used it during 1970 and it was one of the 906’s that Martin Hone (Opposite Lock Club) also drove.

      Here is Bradley driving the car (the stripe is just visible on the underside of the nose) in the Wills Trophy, a sports car race supporting the 1967 British GP. With the field containing many top drivers -including a good number in Ferrari 250LM’s and Ford GT40’s- the car qualified a very respectable 9th, improving to finish 4th in the race and less than a minute behind the winner after 20 laps. The car also came second in class to another 906 driven by Tony Dean. Mike de’Udy qualified his other 906 (#129) in a fine 6th place and might also have finished strongly, but he was unable to start due to being stuck in traffic on his way to the circuit!

      Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5496

    Martin
    Keymaster

    It would be interesting to know what became of this Cardiff-registered 911 Carrera RS, seen resting and well used in a paddock somewhere. Its last MOT expired way back in 2007 but even then these cars were highly prized, so it seems likely to still exist in one form or another.

    It looks to be parked outside the Jim Russell Racing Drivers School. Russell was a successful racer during the 1950’s and was British F3 champion 1955/6/7 before a crash at Le Mans in the works Cooper that he was sharing with Bruce McLaren effectively put and end to his driving career. Born in Norfolk and running a garage there it was natural that he founded his first driver training facility locally at Snetterton, but surprisingly as early as 1956. Other locations were also used later and Derek Bell was one many pupils who went on to fame and success. Long defunct in Britain, there was once one in California but now the only user of the name is at Mont Tremblant in Canada. Incidentally, the first race at Tremblant (in 1964) was won by Canadian Ludwig Heimrath, who was later to score many wins in Porsches, but I digress even further…!

    We can see from the first picture that it had a roll bar and a modified exhaust. Here it is on a different set of wheels taking part in what looks to be the Six Hour Relay race at Silvestone, both pictures dating from the 1980’s.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5510

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Rain is a condition not unknown in British racing and so here are a few Porsches in action in the wet, beginning with this mixed bag of 911’s, 924’s and a 356 (surprisingly carrying AFN sponsorship) in a round of the Pirelli Production Porsche Championship in 1987 or 1988. Remarkably No.122, a 1978 3.0L, is not only still with us but taxed and MOT’d.

    Truly appalling conditions are to be seen on the start/finish straight at Silverstone during the 1981 Six Hours, with the all-Swiss 924 Carrera GTR of Zbinden/Kofel/Vanoli (9th overall/1st class) and the all-French 935 (#9307700912) of Guérin/Bussi/Delaunay (10th overall) almost lost in the spray

    At the same meeting the winning all-German Joest 935J (#0016) of Röhrl/Grohs/Schornsten is reflected in the soaking track as it passes a competitor who fell victim to the wet surface. It looks to be the pole-setting Joest 908/80 (#004) that Mass crashed on the first lap.

    In another damp 1988/9 Pirelli Championship round we see the AFN/Porsche Cars GB 944T (perversely sponsored by a rival tyre maker) cornering hard but steadily.

    In 1989/90 B F Goodrich took over sponsorship of the Championship and Tony Dron raced this 928 for AFN, a somewhat unlikely contender at getting on for 1.5tonnes! This looks to be Silverstone again.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5526

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The Willhire 24 Hour Race is one if the few of its type to have taken place on the British mainland. It ran at Snetterton (a long way from anywhere, so no noise problems) from 1980 to 1994 and catered for production sports and saloon cars. Porsches won the event twice and here is the 928S that Tony Dron/Win Percy/Andy Rouse/Phil Dowsett took to victory in 1983.

    The car is seen above during a pit stop while below the winning crew enjoy the spoils of victory.

    The 928 can just be seen on the left of this picture showing the 911 of Colin Blower/Malcolm Paul/Tiff Needell on the grid prior to the start. The 911 suffered various mechanical problems during the course of the event but still finished and Blower also used it in the Uniroyal Production Sports Car Championship.

    Porsche Championship competitors Bill Taylor/Paul Edwards/John Lock plus 935 racer Barry Robinson won in 1984 sharing a 911 Carrera.

    The above car is seen in the pits during a fuel stop (or perhaps slop).

    Another 911 taking part in the 1984 race.

    From the same year, but wearing rather more sponsorship, this 911 is the centre of attention during a pit stop. All credit to the team for selling sponsorship space on the underside of the spoiler!

    A 911 driver change is captured during the 1987 event. Giroflex Office Furniture were the first sponsor of the Production Porsche Championship in 1984 thanks to their Porsche enthusiast MD Chester Wedgewood and continued to run a car in the championship after this arrangement finished.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5552

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A couple of pictures of 356 1500, 1600 and Carrera owner Edgar Wadsworth racing at Aintree.

    Edgar used his Porsches widely in sprints (see Speed Events – UK Post#5261), hill climbs and circuit races. Above he can be seen getting the better of a Riley RM…

    …while in what looks to be the same race the Riley can be seen among a very mixed field. As well as using his Porsche-engined Denzel in trials and international rallies, Edgar competed in other makes when rallying and racing and was a great user of Healeys (as opposed to Austin-Healeys). He also used less common cars such as a Panhard and a Connaught and competed at Le Mans in 1954 (Triumph TR2, 15th) and 1955 (Cooper T39, 21st), so he was obviously a driver of some ability.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5574

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Although there have been some excellent advertising liveries on racing cars over the years, didn’t they look good when unadorned and in their national racing colours, as here? Actually, this one does bear a bit of advertising, but then all competitors in the BOAC-sponsored endurance races at Brands Hatch carried the BOAC symbol, although it was quite subtle. One can be seen being applied in this 1967 film, along with some of the Porsches competing.

    Hugh Dibley, featured in the film driving a Ferrari, also drove Porsches for Stirling Moss and Mike de’Udy, but our picture shows the works 910 (#027) being driven by Graham Hill. Having practiced into 7th position the car went out on only lap 27 of 211 with an engine problem before co-drive Rindt had been able to take the wheel.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5628

    Martin
    Keymaster

    A couple of shots of drifting 356’s in action at Goodwood, beginning in October 1954 with G Eagleton at Woodcote Corner in a pre-A. Given its features the car would have been pretty new at the time of the photo and is on German export plates, although it is also LHD so possibly destined to travel on elsewhere. Racing at the circuit had finished for the year the month before, so this is likely to have been taken at a sprint meeting.

    This is Dick Steed in his 1953 pre-A in the St Mary’s area of the track in June 1955, perhaps making those officials wonder if their cars were parked in the safest of places. Steed used a 356 on the Coppa d’Oro delle Dolomiti in Italy the year before and finished 27th overall and 4th in class out of a sizeable entry, but he was more often seen on British circuits behind the wheel of a Cooper or a Lotus. He once shared a D-type Jaguar with Ninian Sanderson and at the Goodwood Nine Hours in 1955 he co-drove a 550 with owner Wolfgang Siedel.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5659

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Back in the early 1980’s (yes, that’s already getting on for 40 years ago!) racing an historic car was a little more casual than it has become today, where massive transporters, better than new preparation and six or even seven figure values can often be found.

    This 356B, previously raced by Tony Standen, is seen here when it was owned by Mel Clark and is shown above at Donington in 1982. The unrepaired damage and rust around the engine cover would be unusual today, although that now valuable registration number appears to be dormant so perhaps the car is too?

    These frontal views from around the same period as the first picture also show a bit of minor racing damage, although the car looks to be motoring strongly.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  Martin.
    • #5715

      Martin
      Keymaster

      Hendrik Moulds has pointed out that the above car is a mid-1959 to 1962 model and that it had a crash in 1989. He feels that it is equally likely that it may have been exported or scrapped after this.

      Thanks for this additional information Hendrik

  • #5675

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Not a good day at the office for Mass/Redman in the works 936/78 (#001) at the Silverstone Six Hours in 1979. There were only 36 laps of the race left when this happened to Mass, apparently at least in part due to the tyres turning on the rims. However, these sad remains were still classified 10th on the basis of the distance covered.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5686

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The 1955 Tourist Trophy at the Northern Irish Dundrod road course was the 5th round of the World Sports Car Championship and so all of the big guns were present. This is the factory-entered 550 of Glockner/Siedel which finished in 12th place, some 10 laps behind winner Moss in his Mercedes 300SLR. This was not such a bad result as they qualified 28th and their finish also netted them a second in class behind another 550 of the American duo of Shelby/Gregory, who finished a very creditable 9th.

    Dundrod was only used for car races between 1950-55 and this picture appears to have been taken at the Lindsey Hairpin and also features one of the Kieft’s entered, an 1100 that qualified 37th but crashed. The RAC Tourist Trophy has been held at various locations since 1905 and in that time the race has been run mainly for Sports or Touring cars but also for GT’s and even Grand Prix types.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5697

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Seen applying a bit of opposite lock at Croft in September 1964 is Gordon Durham’s 356A Carrera 1500. Based in the North West and running a haulage business, he is recorded as racing a Carrera -quite possibly this car- as early as 1958, when he beat Jim Clark(!) who was competing in Ian Scott Watson’s 356 1600 Super. At that time Durham’s car would have been quite new and according to Edgar Wadsworth’s son John it had replaced a standard 356A 1500, although by 1966 he seems to have forsaken Porsches and was competing in a Lotus Elan. Shown without bumpers for weight-saving as was so often the case, the drivers’ door looks to bear the signs of close racing and it has a competition exhaust fitted.

    Photo: George Duncan Archive via Peter Settle, who also contributed to the above

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  Martin. Reason: Correction
  • #5711

    Martin
    Keymaster

    Hendrik Moulds points out that the above car is the Carrera which Durham purchased in 1958 to replace the one which he also bought new in 1956. Hendrik also reveals that this car is 59 EUP, later raced by A C Smith (see Posts#5095 & 5571 above) and that it is still around today. Additionally he makes the point that when Durham beat Clark the latter was in a standard 356A not a Carrera and so only had 60% of Durham’s power available.

    Thanks for your input Hendrik.

  • #5723

    Martin
    Keymaster

    In something of a three-way effort Peter Settle has identified this scene as being the chicane at Croft, I have pinned it down to Eric Liddell driving a 356B Carrera in August 1965 and Hendrik Moulds has identified the car as the first of Dickie Stoop’s two Carreras, a 1600 that he bought new and registered YOU 4. That number stayed with DS when he sold the car and was transferred to the 904 that he bought for the 1964 season, hence the Carrera appearing here as 2 LAA and Hendrik further states that this 356 was eventually written off. In a confusing twist to this, while the number 2 LAA is no longer recorded a race prepared LHD ex-US 1953 pre-A 356 has competed in historic events bearing this mark, although what appears to be the same car seems to have carried the numbers 4 BPG (now on a 2015 Ferrari) and 740 XUU (apparently its correct registration) too.

    I think that the Lotus 30 in hot pursuit is being driven by Gerry Ashmore and Liddell was more usually to be found behind the wheel of Norman Cuthbert’s GT40, additionally having international outings in a Lola and a Ferrari and also sharing the driving of a couple of 906’s. He was approached by John Woolfe with an offer to driving his 917 after its initial outing at Le Mans, although Woolfe was killed there and the car destroyed. It was apparently this and the death of Liddell’s friend Paul Hawkins (for whom he drove another GT40) in the same year that prompted him to retire from competitive driving.

    In another of those connections that criss-cross motoring history like a spiders web we should also remember that Hawkins (who was killed in a Lola at Oulton Park in 1969) had a few drives in Porsches and notably won the 1967 Targa Florio in a factory 910. He also famously crashed the Stoop-entered Lotus 33 into the harbour during the 1965 Monaco GP, the only driver other than Ascari to accomplish this feat! When rebuilt that car was eventually sold in 1970 via Jo Siffert (another Porsche connection) to Stockholm’s Museum of Modern Art, where it is classed as a piece of sculpture. It is not on display at present and I can’t help but think that a pre-A 356 might make a better example of ‘car as sculpture’.

    Photo: George Duncan via Peter Settle

  • #5737

    Martin
    Keymaster

    The number of surplus airfields in post-war Britain proved to be a boon to those motor clubs looking to organise sprints and circuit races. Some, such as Silverstone and Castle Combe, were converted and steadily developed while others enjoyed only a fleeting motorsport existence and it is one of these that is shown here. Davidstow in Cornwall, the former Coastal Command Davidstow Moor aerodrome, was only operational as a circuit from 1952 to 1955 but in this time it hosted a number of meeting including three races for Grand Prix-specification cars, one of the few -perhaps only- occasions that such machinery has competed in that county.

    Our picture was taken at the June 1954 event where the wind and rain failed to put off a crowd estimated at 20,000, although all that we know about this pre-A 356 (which would have been almost new at the time) is that it belongs to one P Bucknell.  Other types of motorsport took place at the airfield -the highest in Britain- for another nine years and microlight flying still takes place there today alongside two RAF and wartime museums. A detailed proposal for a F1 circuit and eco holiday village (unlikely bedfellows) was made a few years ago, so there is just a chance that GP cars could visit Cornwall again some day.

    Photo: Ted Walker Archive

  • #5750

    Martin
    Keymaster

    This is certainly one of the less common liveries to be found on a 956 but it is very striking. Pictured at Silverstone for the 1984 1000Km, this Kremer entry (#101) was driven by Konrad/Sutherland to a 6th overall from a grid 13th, although not without some contact with the tyre of another car as we can see.

    In the pits at the same event we can see the smart (but perhaps impractical) Kremer teamwear and note that Franz Konrad has his name on the door in what looks to be a ready-made sticker, in script and with an Austrian flag. He began racing Porsches in 1973 and drove for many Porsche entrants before racing his own Konrad Motorsport cars, which have included a 962 and many 911 variants plus a 911GT1. He was still racing quite recently and his company Konrad Motorsport was founded in 1976, now being based in Germany. Although Porsches have played the biggest part in the company there have been periods of involvement with other makes including Saleen and latterly Lamborghini and in 1991 the company raced their own Lamborghini-engined Konrad 011.

    Photos: Ted Walker Archive

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